Goats and Chickens

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by The LRR Coop, Sep 20, 2019.

  1. The LRR Coop

    The LRR Coop Chirping

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    Hello, new to the group and fairly new to chickens. I've been doing my best to educate myself on the good the bad and ugly so as to be prepared if someone shows any signs of illness and things we should be doing to prevent problems. We are blessed to have retired to a ten acre farm in W TN, with our house being over 600 ft from the road and surrounded by woods. Our chickens have 10 x 12 ft chicken house with six nest boxes. We have 8 young hens and 4 young roos. We currently have four hens laying. Forgive me if my terminology is not up to par. They have a large fenced run but are allowed to free range most days as long as we are home. We also have three Nigerian Dwarf goats. Their stall and enclosure is on the other side of the yard and they are allowed to free range for a couple hours or more a day. They all hang out together. The chickens have recently discovered the goat stall and the covered area where the goats feed. Oh boy do the chickens love that!!! They scratch and peck like crazy in the straw and hay that the goats "waste". It is also very shaded as it's on the edge of the woods. Lots of bugs! Now that they have figured that out, when I let them out they b-line it for the goat enclosure. I saw comments that have me concerned about allowing the chickens in their enclosure. Does anyone have any input on this? Is it okay or is there a reason why we shouldn't? Any health risks? Sorry for being so wordy and thanks in advance!
     
    chrissynemetz and ValerieJ like this.
  2. goldysgirl

    goldysgirl Songster

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    I am sure they could pass parasites back and forth, but i am not sure about diseases...maybe someone with goats will chime in. The place where I work keeps goats...and chickens and ducks get in the pen. All seem healthy and happy
     
  3. Chicken Heel

    Chicken Heel Chirping

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    The thread title made me think about a memory from my younger years. I had a buddy that kept a billy goat in a chicken run with his chickens. One afternoon while I was there for a visit, he went into the run to feed them and he made the mistake of bending over in front of the goat. As I watched quietly to see what might transpire, the ole goat began pawing the ground and then reared up and proceeded to butt my friend in his rear end and knocked him head first about six feet into the chicken coop. When my friend exited the coop covered in feed, straw and poop from head to toe I dang near killed myself laughing.
     
  4. The LRR Coop

    The LRR Coop Chirping

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    Thank you!!
     
    goldysgirl and ValerieJ like this.
  5. The LRR Coop

    The LRR Coop Chirping

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    Too funny!!! I hope ours stay the sweet pets they are. We did not disbud and I can tell you those horns hurt even when it's an accident!! At my age I can't afford to be knocked down. They are so much fun though. We just love sitting out in the yard watching them and the chickens doing what they do!!
     
  6. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    Hi there, hope you are enjoying BYC! :frow

    I kept goat for while... my chickens also LOVED scratching through the goat shed. Some even started laying there. :he

    The biggest problem I ever faced was the goaties relentless attempts to get to the chicken feed... they just LOVE grain. But it could kill them ultimately if they ate too much. Are they whethers or does (sp?) or breeding?

    There are certain parasites that MAY be passed between them, but most are host specific. Getting fecal floats and treating with the correct med for the species you have IF needed, and general good husbandry can go a long way towards prevention of most stuff. Doing "group" fecal floats (several samples in one test) a few times throughout the year can help you to know YOUR internal parasite load as it is effected by so many things including weather, stock density, wild life load, and even soil type. Most species will never be seen in droppings as only large round worms and tape worms may ever be passed in droppings. All other will stay int he intestines and only their microscopic oocysts (eggs) will pass in droppings.

    Sounds like your "young roo" to hen population might be a bit off kilter and I would consider re-homing or eating some if not all of the boys. :drool 1 is more than enough for how many ladies ya got. Young roosters and hens since you mention terminology, are known as cockerel or pullet until they reach 1 year old. It's most important when discussing health and behavioral issues. But it's also great to be on a learning adventure! :wee

    Congrat's on your blessed retirement! :highfive:

    Adding your general location to your profile can help peeps make the best suggestions possible at a glance int he future. ;)

    Please... if a specific comment you saw makes you wonder... post it so we can confirm or deny your cause for concern. :fl
     
  7. ValerieJ

    ValerieJ Free Ranging

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    I am very curious about this! I would like to get a couple small goats, (pygmies?), and add them to my chicken run. My thought is they would be a built in mower. Unlike other chicken runs, my chickens do not take out all the greenery and we have to actually go out there and mow it. LOL I thought a couple goats would help out. However, those little hopping pygmies...would then end up hurting one of my chickens?
     
  8. TwoShepherds

    TwoShepherds Songster

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    I'm following the thread too. I would love to get goats someday. I'm waiting for my kids to be school age so I (haha) have more time to devote to the project.
     
  9. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    Goats are browser not grazers... they don't do much for the grass but fertilize it. Sheep eat grass.

    My chickens don't take all the greenery... because my place is big enough they aren't that confined.

    I have 1 acre in the PNW... that I thought was lush until I tried 2 Nubian goats... they cleared my blackberries... all except the thorny twigs... and started working on eating every TREE in the place. They had hay available free choice. NO WAY is it easier (or cheaper) to keep animals than a lawn mower... :oops:

    Just make sure the goats cannot get to your chicken grain, and it shouldn't be too much issue. Birds don't usually hang around under goat feet waiting to be trampled. Though one getting stepped on is always a possibility... even from myself. I have had some seriously close calls!

    But wait... in case you haven't seen this video and laughed yet, take a look. My goats were SOOOO loud when they first came home without the rest of their herd. The tongues sticking out cracks me up! :lol:


    ETA: Working on my trees means eating the bark and girdling them... not the leaves as it was winter time.
     
  10. ValerieJ

    ValerieJ Free Ranging

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    Ok. That settles it for me. :lau
     

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