goslings nibbles are turning to bites.

sydney13

Songster
9 Years
Mar 11, 2010
1,364
15
194
Massachusetts
when my gosling was only a few weeks she would nibble my hair and hands and it didn't hurt but now that she is 3 weeks the nibbles are a lot harder and it starts to hurt. She likes to graze with my chicks and hen and they get along well but the gosling has started to chew the feathers out of the hen. as they get older do they stop the chewing on everthing?
i try to tell her no when she bites the chicken or me but she doesn't listen, will she when she is older?
An i was also wondering when goslings begin to learn diffrent people's faces? my gosling follows me every where but she also tries to follows strangers, will she when she is older?
 

Kim65

Songster
10 Years
May 29, 2009
625
10
131
Washington state
Geese nibble or bite each other on the feathers as a form of communication. It doesn't hurt when your feathers get nipped no matter how hard. We are unlucky enough to be bald and when a goose gives a conversational nip at us, it's gonna hurt. It's not personal. It's something you live with if you have a pet goose, at least that's how I look at it.

My adult geese are surprisingly gentle when they nibble my face but about 30% of the time, it hurts to have your lip stretched out six inches or so
.

The don't have hands, they have their bill. They use their bill like hands, so no, they will never stop biting, nipping, pulling, chewing things. They are curious and intelligent, too, so they'll "play" with objects with their bill. It's a major goose thing.

I have been able with lots of consistent reinforcement to teach my gander Petey "no". I tell him "no" and push his chest backward away from the no no. I have to do it several times before he gives up. But telling him no from a distance makes him look up at me and stop (for a few seconds) so he gets it. He picks on my bantam house chicken sometimes, and I can tell him no and he'll stop.

I've heard geese get smarter with age, so I'm not worried he doesn't already obey 100% of the time.
 

goosedragon

Songster
10 Years
Mar 28, 2009
2,351
21
171
Central NC
Quote:I'm not sure they learn people's faces at all. I could always freak them out when I appeared in a hat. after they heard my voice they would calm down. AS for adult geese they can nibble very gently when they want to....
 

sheep

In the Brooder
10 Years
Feb 12, 2009
36
0
22
Quote:I'm not sure they learn people's faces at all. I could always freak them out when I appeared in a hat. after they heard my voice they would calm down. AS for adult geese they can nibble very gently when they want to....

My gosling seems to know my face and body from anyone else's who walks with us. My brother, sister, my mom. If I take the lead, he's right next to me, but if I fall back, he gets very upset. He also make a big fuss when someone other than me enters my room.
 

Jennyhaschicks

Songster
11 Years
May 3, 2008
1,048
7
181
Maine
Mine used to nibble at me when they were younger. They were hatched in the beginning of April. Once they got to be around a month old they didn't nibble on me so bad. They still nibble at my arms but are very gentle now. They will nibble at my clothing and they are a bit rougher though.
 

banter

Songster
11 Years
Mar 3, 2008
1,843
3
189
Raymond Maine
If you only have one it will treat you as another goose.Goose parents do not tolerate cheeky kids! They goose them! They learn good goose manners very quickly! If it nibbles too hard while you are holding it , gently grab and hold it's bill for a second or two. If it nips you on an ankle or goes after you when your walking around, goose it! (pop it on it's bun!). That's what mama or papa goose would do! You don't have to be mean, just assertive!
 
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adrian

Songster
10 Years
May 12, 2009
736
14
141
Regina, SK
My geese definitely know my face. They learn it more as they get older. Geese have exceptionally good eyes, you must remember. If it bites you, give it a little poke and say "no". It's not very different from what goose parents would do; give a loud honk and a little pinch. Probably they learn from their siblings, as well, who would squeal when bitten.
 

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