great stuff sealants

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by aschmude, Sep 23, 2013.

  1. aschmude

    aschmude New Egg

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    Does anyone have info on Great Stuff sealant? There are gaps in my coop and I was going to use Great Stuff but cannot find any information on whether it's toxic to chickens.
     
  2. write2caroline

    write2caroline Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have not but If this product has a strong odor, I would apply it and let it fully cure so that the chickens are not exposed to the fumes. You might contact DOW and ask directly but other similar products do tend to have strong fumes and if it requires you to wear a respirator or avoid fumes or any mention of good ventilation then you can do yourself a favor and not use it wet around your chickens.

    Welcome to the forum!

    Caroline
     
  3. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    It's probably is toxic. There are two kinds, low expansion (for window frames and the like) and high expansion. Both are probably not good for them to eat and they probably will.
    Where are you located and why are you worried about gaps? Gaps IMO help add ventilation.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2013
  4. aschmude

    aschmude New Egg

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    Thanks!
     
  5. aschmude

    aschmude New Egg

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    I am in Virginia. The gaps are around the chickens house, mainly the roof. I want to seal them up for winter protection.
     
  6. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Please don't. The chickens need ventilation much more than warmth.
    What breeds do you have?
    It gets well below 0 here and my coops have big open windows and gaps year round. I've lost chickens to heat but never to cold. When chickens live in a tight building they can suffer from respiratory illnesses.
    One of my chicken keeping friends here has a nice tight coop and a covered run with roosts in both. Last winter (her first with chickens) her hens never spent one night in the coop, preferring the roost in the run. They were and still are quite healthy with the fresh air.
    The gaps around the roof will allow the moisture and ammonia in the coop to vent off.
    As long as the gaps don't allow rain to enter, I wouldn't change a thing.

    ETA
    Most of the breeds people own were developed in cold climates and open barns long before there was a means to keep them warm.
    They didn't die and we shouldn't worry.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2013
  7. aschmude

    aschmude New Egg

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    I will take your advice. As far as the breeds, to be honest, I am not really sure. There are spots I may have to seal to prevent rain from coming in but otherwise I will leave everything else as is.
     
  8. Mr MKK FARMS

    Mr MKK FARMS Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! Glad you joined us! [​IMG]
     
  9. aschmude

    aschmude New Egg

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    Thanks! What a great site this is especially for first time chicken owners like myself.
     
  10. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Chickens are jungle fowl rather than house pets and need fresh air.

    Preventing the rain from coming in is very important. Rain intrusion causes wet bedding - not good.
    Chickens give off a lot of moisture in the form of respiration and feces. That creates humidity and in a tight coop, a good environment for pathogens to prosper and the cause of frostbite in winter. Add rain intrusion to that making matters worse. A good overhang with roofline venting usually works.
     

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