Ground corn cobs?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by mrkep, Dec 14, 2011.

  1. mrkep

    mrkep Chillin' With My Peeps

    97
    7
    94
    Mar 10, 2010
    Richwood , Ohio
    I was in TSC this morning and saw a bag of ground corn cobs that was in the horse supplies section. The claim was that it would absorb large amounts of moisture per cu. ft. Says it cuts down on clean out time. I thought it might be a good addition to the pine flakes in the coop. So has anyone here tried it? I use the DLM all winter, then a total clean out in spring, so anything that cuts down on moisture seems good.
    waddaya think??
    mrkep
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Back in the day, that was the litter of choice. It was outstanding. Today, since more harvesting equipment shells the corn from the cob in the field, rather than "picking" the corn as in days gone by, there is far less corn cob available. Whenever I have seen ground corn cob for sale it has been priced much too high for me to use economically. Love the product. It is natural, highly absorbent and easily integrated back into the compost or directly into the soil.
     
  3. BrattishTaz

    BrattishTaz Roo Magnet

    4,445
    17
    213
    Jan 8, 2011
    Tampa Area, Florida
    I saw the corn cob bedding too. Do the chickens eat it? Could it cause crop impactions? I would want to use it in the brooder instead of shavings.
     
  4. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    They'll pick through it, especially if a few broken bits of corn are still to be found. But, no. There's no issue with impaction. The chicken has been around a few thousand years and if they all were so stupid to commit suicide by crop impaction, well.... those strains would have died out long ago. [​IMG]
     
  5. BrattishTaz

    BrattishTaz Roo Magnet

    4,445
    17
    213
    Jan 8, 2011
    Tampa Area, Florida
    Fred's Hens :

    They'll pick through it, especially if a few broken bits of corn are still to be found. But, no. There's no issue with impaction. The chicken has been around a few thousand years and if they all were so stupid to commit suicide by crop impaction, well.... those strains would have died out long ago. [​IMG]

    I dunno. I have a couple of exceptionally stupid Orpingtons. The "twins" are named Stupid and Stoopid. [​IMG]
     
  6. kari_dawn

    kari_dawn Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,372
    28
    198
    Nov 2, 2009
    North Texas
    Quote:BLEH I used ground corn cob as bedding in my brooder, and it was awful. You know how babies like to kick everything around and dump their water and poo...[​IMG] Anyway, I found the combination of wet corn cob, baby chick poo, and knocked over feeders very offensive on the nose, and not as easy to clean as I would like...yes, it is absorbant, but it stinks when it gets wet, and my babies kept kicking it into their water. It would clump up and swell, and the babies couldn't drink around the ground up pieces.

    Maybe it works better as a bedding in a coop for adults, but in my experience, it is not something I would use again in my brooder. I will stick to sand or pine shavings...
     
  7. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

    66,465
    17,045
    836
    May 3, 2009
    New Jersey
    Ground corn cob is excellent bedding, and I used it for years in my pigeon lofts. Much like Fred's Hens, it has become too expensive for me. I now use the pelleted wood horse bedding - it's OK at best.
     
  8. deannaj

    deannaj Out Of The Brooder

    12
    0
    24
    Oct 20, 2014
    Interesting, maybe I will save my corn cobs next time, I read that corn is good to add to the chickens diet in the winter, that it is suppose to help keep them warm. So I have ground up a bunch of corn. The only thing that bothers me is if it will keep. I have no preservatives in it. All it is was the dried up corn from the garden. I dried it out and ground it up. I was planning on adding it to the layer feed this winter. Does anyone have any ideas?
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by