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Has anyone ever trapped a fox?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Lelilamom, Nov 4, 2015.

  1. RonP

    RonP Chillin' With My Peeps

    You must realize 1" chicken wire is great for containing your birds, but little else...

    A fox could easily scale a 6 or 7 foot fence without touching it...

    After my run fortifications, I shot this fox, with my camera, and enjoyed his frustrated determination immeasurably knowing my sleepless nights were over [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    He was one of many visiting my coop.

    He is also pictured in my avatar as a pup. I thought I was after a coon...

    I kept him confined till my reinforcements were made, then he was released with a full belly of my dogs food, as my battles were over, and he no longer an enemy.

    He came back often as he became good friends with my useless guard dog, often seen playing together in the woods behind the coop.


    I wish you luck with your battle against mother nature.

    I also hope you do not endure the heart wrenching losses many, including myself, have sustained in similar situations.
     
  2. varidgerunner

    varidgerunner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Doesn't matter what size wire you have, if it's not buried 12 inches in the ground and turned out horizontal 12 to 18 inches under the dirt, he can dig under it in about a minute. The longer he hangs around, the more chances he has to figure out a way around your enclosure. They can go through most two by four welded wire that is easily available, once they figure out how.
     
  3. Lelilamom

    Lelilamom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Agreed. We have the 1" chicken wire 18" into the ground and then back up again and over the run onto the other side and into the ground 18" and back up again. Each side of the run is reinforced from the 3ft mark to 18 inches below grade.

    Problem is, we have more than one fox now, a red fox, out in the middle of the day. The chickens are out in their chicken yard, which is just 5ft chicken wire. It's not meant to keep predators out, but chickens in during the daylight hours. If I have a fox out there at 11 AM, there's no way I can keep those chickens safe.

    I'm feeling defeated.

    ****UPDATE****
    I was walking out of my house with my rifle to sit a bit this afternoon when I heard a gunshot go off in my backyard. My neighbor, who was on the lookout for the fox, had seen it crossing the backyard and shot it. It was the red fox, about 20 lbs, mangy as all get up and older. My neighbor said the fox looked a bit disoriented, walking and stopping, walking and stopping. Rabid? Just mange? Your guess is as good as mine. But I'm glad it's gone. One down and a whole forest worth to go. A licensed trapper has been contacted and will be here Monday to set traps around ours and our neighbor's property.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2015
  4. varidgerunner

    varidgerunner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I do a lot of trapping for nuisance animals and find that many times an animal that is causing trouble has some disease or injury causing the behavior. Yet another argument against the idea that there is no point removing a predator because another will take it's place. Hopefully the one that takes it's place will be healthy and rely more on natural food sources.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. Catnip5

    Catnip5 Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    Inhumane to say the least. Do yourself a favor and put up an electric fence. I did and from the moment I flipped the switch I haven't had a fox or other predator breach it. I had a few red foxes prior and lost 3 girls before investing in the premier1 netting - super easy to put up and move around and it did the trick immediately - total peace of mind for me, peace for the girls and peace for the fox just trying to survive. Killing off all the existing foxes just opens the door for more to move in.

    Peace out with an electric fence.
     
  6. varidgerunner

    varidgerunner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In many cases, inhumane would be letting an animal that's whole body is covered with scabs starve to death in the winter. They have always been sustainably harvested by indigenous peoples, that is something that they need to remain healthy as a viable population. Human predation is built into their survival model. Whether or not your chickens are safe, fox living in close proximity to humans is not a healthy or natural condition. There is a significant health risk to you as well as your pets. Rabies is serious, and not having foxes living in your back yard is a step towards risk management.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. Catnip5

    Catnip5 Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    I agree that an animal whose health is severely compromised to the point of potential starvation should be humanely euthanized. Humans have encroached into territories that were once considered safe for wild animals - leaving little to no territory for them to peacefully exist. Fox living in proximity to humans is, in many many many parts of the country, quite the norm as a result. Having worked as an ACO for several years I can safely say there is not a significant health risk to humans, though there is a risk to domesticated pets and therefore their human companions. Rabies is serious yes. Vaccinate your pets and stay away from handling wild animals, dead or alive, trapped or otherwise is a good start.

    Solution: Electric fence.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2015
  8. Bigwig

    Bigwig Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If your going to trap a fox catch it in a live trap and shoot it though the bars. It is much more humane than a steel trap (no offense gattrapper)
     
  9. varidgerunner

    varidgerunner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In most circumstances it is almost impossible to catch foxes consistently in a cage trap, ("live trap" not really being a good term because footholds are considered "live" traps.) Many times, a fox caught in a properly equipped foothold will show less damage than one that has been caged in the rare instances that they can be captured in a cage trap. With shock springs, swivels, padded offset jaws, the foothold is the most humane and effective tool to control foxes. While the cartoon image of a huge contraption with serrated teeth is burned into the minds of many, restraint with the least pain inflicted is the goal of any successful trapper. If you can't keep them comfortable in the trap, they will damage themselves and escape. Most that are restrained in modern equipment are quite calm, some even sleeping, until they see a human coming.
     
  10. mechanic57

    mechanic57 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    "Live trap" cages will trap an animal alive, but they make no claim the animal will be unharmed. I've seen a few different species of animals injure themselves trying to get out of a cage. They don't always just sit there calmly waiting to be dealt with.
     

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