Hatchery chicken?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Patoot, Oct 7, 2010.

  1. Patoot

    Patoot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 20, 2010
    What does the term hatchery refer to? I have seen it posted in many threads. Does it mean it's not a show quality chicken or something? Hatchery as opposed to what?

    Thanks.

    Bree
     
  2. nuttyredhead

    nuttyredhead Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 3, 2010
    Southern NH
    I believe it means hatchery -- hatched at a hatchery such as Mount Healthy vs hatched at home.
     
  3. alicefelldown

    alicefelldown Looking for a broody

    Aug 18, 2008
    Quote:Hatchery birds are ones that are purchased either (online/phone/in person) from a hatchery (such as Murray McMurray, Nature's, Ideal, etc) or from their local feed store (which orders them in bulk from a hatchery). These are typically purchased/delivered as day old chicks, and can be vaccinated at the hatchery before you get them - although most feed stores will not pay the extra fee.

    Quote:As opposed to birds/eggs obtained from a breeder (either small time backyard, or experienced breeder). These birds/eggs will cost much more than your standard hatchery chicks and be closer to the APA/ABA Standards of Perfection. NOTE: Not all backyard breeders strive to meet the Standards. Do your research if you feel that you want to a) get involved in breeding and preserving any particular breed, or b) want to get into showing birds at county fairs / qualifying meets.
    Quote:Not all 'breeder' birds are the same - a lot of people get their start with 'hatchery quality' birds and a few generations later start selling their birds as 'breeder quality'. Meeting the APA/ABA standards requires a lot of work and knowledge of the breed - which is not something everyone is willing to do. There is nothing wrong with backyard / small time breeding - this where your research would come into play if you choose to strive to the approved standards.

    Quote:Again, not all birds from a 'breeder' will be show quality. Even those purchased from the 'big names' will likely be the ones deemed inferior for their own personal breeding programs. Unlike dogs/horses/etc. there is no concept of a 'pedigree' in poultry. Even a Grand Champion winner can produce chicks that do not meet the standards. A lot of breeds commonly available have hidden secrets in their genetics that will pop up under the right conditions. It takes time and effort to weed out the birds 'throwing' (producing in their chicks) incorrect coloring/feathers/etc.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2010
  4. prov31gal

    prov31gal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 29, 2009
    over the mountain
    Quote:Hatchery birds are ones that are purchased either (online/phone/in person) from a hatchery (such as Murray McMurray, Nature's, Ideal, etc) or from their local feed store (which orders them in bulk from a hatchery). These are typically purchased/delivered as day old chicks, and can be vaccinated at the hatchery before you get them - although most feed stores will not pay the extra fee.

    Quote:As opposed to birds/eggs obtained from a breeder (either small time backyard, or experienced breeder. These birds/eggs will cost much more than your standard hatchery chicks and be closer to the APA/ABA Standards of Perfection. NOTE: Not all backyard breeders strive to meet the Standards. Do your research if you feel that you want to a) get involved in breeding and preserving any particular breed, or b) want to get into showing birds at county fairs / qualifying meets.
    Quote:Not all 'breeder' birds are the same - a lot of people get their start with 'hatchery quality' birds and a few generations later start selling their birds as 'breeder quality'. Meeting the APA/ABA standards requires a lot of work and knowledge of the breed - which is not something everyone is willing to do. There is nothing wrong with backyard / small time breeding - this where your research would come into play if you choose to strive to the approved standards.

    Quote:Again, not all birds from a 'breeder' will be show quality. Even those purchased from the 'big names' will likely be the ones deemed inferior for their own personal breeding programs. Unlike dogs/horses/etc. there is no concept of a 'pedigree' in poultry. Even a Grand Champion winner can produce chicks that do not meet the standards. A lot of breeds commonly available have hidden secrets in their genetics that will pop up under the right conditions. It takes time and effort to weed out the birds 'throwing' (producing in their chicks) incorrect coloring/feathers/etc.

    here here! good explaination! it is important to remember that just because the bird was bred and hatched at home, or from a breeder or even the big breeders, doesn not automatically mean ( or even usually mean) it is better than a bird from cackle hatchery or myers or where ever. you have to look to the breed standards. excellent answer.
     
  5. Patoot

    Patoot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 20, 2010
    Thanks. I was just curious. I have no intentions of ever breeding. I just wasn't sure what it meant.

    Bree
     
  6. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    Up until recently, all my chickens have been "feed store" chicks and I've been pretty lucky in that they've grown up to be gorgeous chickens. Gorgeous PQ "pet quality" chickens. I haven't gotten any oddball "what is that?" chickens. However, my Welsummer just hatched four chicks which I am sure are some sort of mix, now.

    Except for the "my chickens hatching" which I'm allowing, I've turned to buying eggs from breeders - and I also don't really care if they are SQ "show quality" or not. I'm just trying to get other breeds into my very varied flock.

    That's because I like seeing the different breeds, and I'm also going for a highly varied, colorful egg basket. [​IMG]
     

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