Hatching Conures.

Discussion in 'Caged Birds - Finches, Canaries, Cockatiels, Parro' started by tmarr, Nov 16, 2015.

  1. tmarr

    tmarr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Guys have any of you hatched your own Parrot/Conures?
     
  2. nchls school

    nchls school Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes. I've had sun-jenday-green cheeks breed. Also parrotletts, love birds, Bourk's, cockatiels, and budgies.
     
  3. tmarr

    tmarr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Brilliant, I was going to try and hatch my own parrotlett or conure, in the summer. I'm a bit stumped at the brooder part, it seems very complicated and expensive. Could a heat lamp and or heat pad be used or what would you suggest? Thanks.
     
  4. nchls school

    nchls school Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have always hatched any eggs that the parents wouldn't take care of under foster parents-cockatiels work well. I do not care for incubators unless there is no choice. Next breeding season I'm going to try hatching the conure eggs under my serama bantams. It should work as the bantams are very close to the conure size.

    For a brooder I use a heating pad. the chicks grow quickly and it does not take to long before heat is not needed; especially if you have more than one chick. Many conures will breed during the winter. While spring and summer is the usual time, I have had nandays and sun conures nest during the winter. My birds are under artificial lighting and it is spring/summer year around in my bird room.

    DUFUS-A SUN-JENDAY CROSS.
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    THIS IS THE SERAMA HEN THAT I PLAN ON USING TO HATCH THE CONURE EGGS-IT'S A CEREAL BOWL THAT SHE IS BROODING IN, SO YOU HAVE AN IDEA JUST HOW SMALL SHE IS.

    How are you planning on hatching the eggs? Do you have a breeding pair? Are you planning on hand feeding?
     
  5. Rosa moschata

    Rosa moschata Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Incubating eggs and getting them to hatch isn't the hardest part. What's far more involved is hand-rearing babies from the egg -- you know it's much more difficult than raising poultry, right?
     
  6. nchls school

    nchls school Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So very true. The first few days of hand feeding a newly hatched parrot specie is nerve wracking and dangerous for the chick if done wrong. It is not something for anyone not experienced. For someone who wants to learn, it's best to find someone to show you how. If that's not possible, start with a chick that's a few weeks old. At that age chicks are more durable. One small mistake with a tiny chick can, and often does, end in disappointment and the death of the chick.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2015
  7. tmarr

    tmarr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes I've been doing a lot of reading about it. Not going to try until nearer the summer, I would love to try parrotlets or conures but I believe it's better to start with cockatiels? I would be buying the fertilized eggs and basically hand rearing.
     
  8. nchls school

    nchls school Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cockatiels are a good specie to learn hand feeding with; not so tiny as the parrotlets and definitely more durable. I would recommend that you find a cockatiel chick that is between 2 and 3 weeks of age. At this age they would not require a heat source for long or at all, but still young enough to accept hand feeding fairly fast. You might even find that a hand reared cockatiel is just the bird you want; less temperamental than conures and parrotlets. Much less bitey. A hen cockatiel is a great deal quieter than the conures. When asked what makes the best bird pet, I always say cockatiel.
     
  9. Rosa moschata

    Rosa moschata Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Also, be aware that parrot eggs don't travel nearly as well as poultry eggs. Those "fertile parrot egg" scams bank on this, blaming failure to hatch on the buyer -- and often sell infertile eggs and/or eggs of other species as well.
     
  10. nchls school

    nchls school Chillin' With My Peeps

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    And the parrot species begin incubation with the first egg or soon thereafter. Poultry eggs not so. I believe this is also a factor. I do not think that parrot specie embryos can survive the time it takes to ship/mail the eggs. When "buying parrot/conure eggs" I have always gone and got them so the incubation process was as normal as possible; uninterrupted.
     

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