hatching eggs, one? Or multiple?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by jstinsmommy, Sep 6, 2014.

  1. jstinsmommy

    jstinsmommy Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 13, 2012
    I have a buff orphington that is going through her broody stage right now. I have always just ever bought chick's. Never eggs. But I am considering it. If I decide to do it, how many should I do? Can I do just one or two? Or do I need more? And advice is appreciated
     
  2. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    I'd do at least two, just in case. I have the space and a pretty good setup for a broody so I load 'em up! Last year I tried 12 eggs per hen (all large fowl) but didn't have much luck with that. (I think part of the problem was that my rooster was a dud) So this year I put 10 eggs under each broody. The first hen hatched out 5, the second hatched out 8.
     
  3. jstinsmommy

    jstinsmommy Out Of The Brooder

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    makes complete sense, thank you
     
  4. jstinsmommy

    jstinsmommy Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok now my next question. If I get eggs for her to hatch I have a separate coop to out just her and the eggs in but it is shielded from the weather but is not enclosed with a nesting box. Will that be OK you think?
     
  5. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    It is not enclosed, as in other chickens or animals can get in? Or you just don't have a specific nest box? You really don't have to separate her at all, but it does make things a bit easier during incubation. If she's in with the flock, other chickens may get in the nest to lay their eggs and end up breaking your broody's eggs. You'd also have to mark your broody's eggs so you can remove any extras that show up during the day. The advantage is, once the chicks hatch, they're already part of the flock.
     
  6. jstinsmommy

    jstinsmommy Out Of The Brooder

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    It is safe from other flock and predators. It just doesn't have a specific nesting box. All my other hens lay their eggs in the one nesting box she has taken over so I just thought it might be easier to decipher the eggs this way. I have an old hub I can put in to act as a nesting box if you think it will be warmer for her.
     
  7. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    How cold is it there? Needing warmth shouldn't be a problem right now. One thing to consider when moving your broody. She may not want to stay wherever you put her. I've had some move just fine, one totally flipped out, broke most of her eggs and never went broody again. One just absolutely refused to set anywhere but the nest SHE chose. Didn't matter if I moved her during the day or at night. (If you do move her, I would recommend doing it at night with as little light and commotion as possible.)
     
  8. jstinsmommy

    jstinsmommy Out Of The Brooder

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    We are in central California. Been pretty warm at nights here. No lower than in the mid 50 ' s maybe higher. Ooh good to know about her wanting that particular nest. Now I'm a little worried.
     
  9. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    Don't worry yet. She may move just fine. How long has she been broody? The one I had that flipped out had actually been sitting on her hidden nest for over a week. Unfortunately, she was not in a safe place at all, so I decided to move her. Last year I moved one three or four times. She absolutely would not stay where I put her. She wanted her chosen spot. That being said, I've moved several that are perfectly content to sit where I put them. More of those than the stubborn ones. I have a broody wanna be right now (she just weaned her last batch of chicks a couple of weeks ago) but I'm in MN, and this is not a good time of year. She'll keep them warm while they're little babies, but by the time they're old enough to be fully feathered, it will be early December. Just don't want to take that chance. We never know how cold it will be by then.
     
  10. jstinsmommy

    jstinsmommy Out Of The Brooder

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    She had been broody for like a month. I have been trying to break her this whole time.
     

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