Hatching VS Adopting Chicks

Balor

In the Brooder
Oct 23, 2019
10
18
31
Hello members of BYC,

I'll just preface this post by saying I'm currently not in the position to get an Emu yet due to lack of space and proper fencing. I have been following certain hatch threads for quite some time and understand that I currently would be unable to house one, however that will hopefully change in the foreseeable future and for now I am just looking for information on this topic.

I am wondering just how much an emu's temperament and behaviour will be affected by hatching the emu yourself and having it imprint on you right out of the egg, versus adopting a chick at a very young age.

From what I've been reading up on, they will be rather tame raised from a young age, but I was wondering about the overall effects and if anyone would have any experience they could contribute on this topic.
Thanks in advance fellow emu enthusiasts!
 

briefvisit

Songster
Nov 9, 2013
866
829
196
Hi, Balor. Welcome to BYC.

This'll take several posts: big subject:

there's perhaps a confusion here. You will tame Baby Emoo. It will not be alarmed by your presence. It'll run to you ('cause you got treats . . . ). B.E. will love you!

But by the time it's an adult, it'll be a dinosaur. And when other emus turn up, crazy dinosaur stuff will happen. And how much it loves you isn't gonna stop that stuff happening.

[Two breeding-pairs here at first light this morning: Limpychick and male consort ('Mr. Limpychick') And Tooshtoosh and female consort ('Mrs. Tooshtoosh') Conflict began about two minutes after they emerged from their roosts in the bush.]

SE
 

briefvisit

Songster
Nov 9, 2013
866
829
196
Second Bit:

I have only ever tamed wild chicks. Pretty sure that the earlier you get to interact with E. Moo the better. Here is 'Uno':
IMG_20141113_170522.jpg
She was the youngest chick I got to tame.

So, Early Interaction is the first factor.
The second is time invested. The more time, the tamer the bird. (Tameness not temperament . . . ) I mean, you can pour effort into taming chicks.
 

Balor

In the Brooder
Oct 23, 2019
10
18
31
@briefvisit
Second Bit:

I have only ever tamed wild chicks. Pretty sure that the earlier you get to interact with E. Moo the better. Here is 'Uno':
View attachment 1942994She was the youngest chick I got to tame.

So, Early Interaction is the first factor.
The second is time invested. The more time, the tamer the bird. (Tameness not temperament . . . ) I mean, you can pour effort into taming chicks.
Thank you for your knowledge @briefvisit! Having followed some posts of yours earlier, you definitely seem to be the expert on wild emus and have a lot of experience in the topic.
I’d be curious to see the difference between your experiences with wild emus versus someone with their own emus.

With that topic in mind, I am also curious to see if anyone has noticed big differences between hatching emus versus adopting at a relatively young age. Obviously it will depend on the emu, and gender apparently, but I’m still curious on the topic of just how much it is a factor and at what age does adopting them lose effectiveness for taming.
 

briefvisit

Songster
Nov 9, 2013
866
829
196
'the difference between your experiences with wild emus versus someone with their own emus.'

I see amazing photos. E. Moo sitting in cars. E. Moo standing at the back door. E. Moo with a party hat on. (Wanna force Greedy Emu here to put on a party hat? Good luck with that)

SE
 
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