Hawk problem? Talk to your DNR!

Trish1974

Araucana enthusiast
5 Years
Mar 16, 2016
3,078
6,855
592
North Central IN
My Coop
My Coop
I just wanted to put this information out there, as I have seen a lot of threads the past several months about hawk attacks.

Last weekend the young man who hunts my property brought a friend with him. He saw my chickens and mentioned he had chickens, layers, and his mother and sister show silkies. He preceded to tell me how they have had a horrible hawk problem recently. He said it was nothing to look out the window and see several hawks sitting right on top of the chicken runs and coops. He said at one time they counted 7 hawks in their yard at the same time! They had a DNR officer come out. Four hawks were perched about when he arrived. They were able to show him several pictures of multiple hawks stalking their chickens, and the DNR said "that is ridiculous! Just start shooting them." He left the family with his business card with a case number on it - no permit issued.

No, this probably won't work if you have a random hawk stalking your flock, but I have seen posts on here where people have had severe hawk problems such as this. So instead of throwing up your hands and giving up, call your DNR officer and talk to them about it. It doesn't hurt to try. You may be surprised.
 

hillbilly91

Free Ranging
5 Years
Jan 2, 2016
2,602
4,027
576
Westminster sc
All I can say is that no matter what, get that 'permission' in writing. If a neighbor reports you, that agent may have to choose between his job and your jail time. Don't trust their word. The fines are stiff and the tolerance is low. Be careful.
If it has a case number it is more then likely on file
 

Backyard Bruce

Songster
Apr 11, 2018
293
516
186
Sullivan County, N.Y.
I'd be getting that in writing signed with the officers blood from the quill pen of a hawk feather.

Or I'd just keep them penned until the hawks move on to better feeding grounds...we have nesting hawks, eagles you name it around here.
protecting the flock can be daunting but there is no better protection from birds of prey than to keep the prey caged.
 

CanadaEh

Songster
May 31, 2018
370
647
176
Canada
They had a DNR officer come out. Four hawks were perched about when he arrived. They were able to show him several pictures of multiple hawks stalking their chickens, and the DNR said "that is ridiculous! Just start shooting them." He left the family with his business card with a case number on it - no permit issued.
Good info by may highly depend on particular DNR officer.

Try fishing line over the top of your run (versus or besides netting or fencing).

My theory is that in aerial predator eyes:
netting/fencing (which is safe to walk over while trying to break through) = you are desperately trying to protect your chickens, whereas
fishing line (danger of tangling) = you are trying to catch the predator (welcoming it into the chicken run and just using chickens as bait), so the predator think "they are already onto me and I better stay away from that evil person's entrapment"
 

chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,047
4,195
431
Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
Multiple nooses of fishing line fixed onto small cages in which rodents or pigeons are held for bait is the world standard for capturing hawks and some falcons that are used in falconry. There is also a trap mostly used to capture Peregrine falcons. These traps are clamshell shaped contraptions that are held open with a trigger made out of 2 separate pieces of wood. When the falcon dislocates these pieces of wood, then the two halves of the trap slaps closed over the head of the Peregrine.
 

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