Heat source?

webs66

In the Brooder
11 Years
Jul 11, 2008
20
0
32
Rhode Island
Can anyone tell me if it is necessary to keep a heat lamp in the coop? We are in RI and it is starting to get cool at night now and we are starting to think about winter. It doesn't usually get much below 20s here in winter but I'm not sure what they can handle temperature wise. We have Buff Orps, the coop is 8x8 but it is full height (6-8') not insulated and it is raised approx 6' off the ground. right now there are 25, but we think there are about 10-12 roos so my guess is we will probably only keep a couple so we should have 12-15 chickens in there thru the winter. do we need to run the heat light or will they be fine without it.

I tend to go overboard, and my DH says they will be fine without it, I can't help it I just turned the light on for them now and it's only supposed to be 40 tonight.
 

Omran

Crowing
Jul 26, 2008
3,074
13
274
Bagdad KY
Quote:
Hello there,it is not necessary at all for now to put any heat ,because if they used to heated coop now so imagine in real cold winter!!!!
But I would run elctricity to the coop now and make every thing ready in case winter comes and then it will be very hard to dig the ground to run the wires,I am planning on running underground utilities to my coop water and electric,but I will use the normal light when the days get shorters,but no heating lamp,because here in KY it does not get very cold for a long period and my neighbor who raises chickens for years told me that he never put any heat fo them unless they have chicks.
Good Luck
Omran
 

SewingDiva

Songster
12 Years
Aug 31, 2007
700
9
151
Westwood MA, South of Boston
We have no heat in our coop and don't plan on adding any. We're not that far from you. Last night they predicted a hard frost, and all I did was close the door the coop for the first time.

The sun just came up and I let them out - they're fine.

thumbsup.gif


~Phyllis
 
Last edited:

pdpatch

Songster
11 Years
Apr 5, 2008
619
5
140
Hastings, Nebraska
The best tempature range for layers or broilers is between 45 and 85 degrees, anything above or below for very long will effect egg production or growth. It seem that as long as the period outside this range is at least 12 hours it doesn't bother production to much.

Getting things ready ahead of the time you will need it is a very good Idea. As it will reduce the stress you will have later when it does get colder.
 

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