Height of Hanging feeder/waterer?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by cswartout, Jul 20, 2008.

  1. cswartout

    cswartout Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm going to hang a feeder and waterer and wondered what was the best height for them off the floor. All our hens are full size, not bantams.

    Thanks in advance for the answers!
     
  2. Buster

    Buster Back to Work

    I put my waterers on milk crates and it keeps them from kicking the bedding into them. I adjust the feeders as the birds get older. I keep it just high enough to just barely get their heads over, otherwise they scatter feed everywhere.
     
  3. sunnydee

    sunnydee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Glad to see this post as I was wondering the same thing! Thank you!!
     
  4. dixiechick

    dixiechick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Ditto. Love the milk crate idea...but might be too high for my bantams?
     
  5. Buster

    Buster Back to Work

    My bantams just jump up on the milk crate to drink.
     
  6. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    Leesville, SC
    Hanging feeders/waterers should be hung at the height of the birds back.
     
  7. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:I agree! Everything else that I tried made for messy water and scattered, dirty food.

    Edit: Actually, mine are an inch or two higher than their backs, and they have to stretch their necks a little bit to reach the waterer and feeder that are hanging on small chains.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2008
  8. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    Quote:I agree! Everything else that I tried made for messy water and scattered, dirty food.

    Edit: Actually, mine are an inch or two higher than their backs, and they have to stretch their necks a little bit to reach the waterer and feeder that are hanging on small chains.

    Doing that, making them stretch, wont hurt them and keeps the from making a mess.
    I hang my feeders from an adjustable cleat, like you would use for a tent stay. Then I can raise and lower them easily.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2008
  9. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:I agree! Everything else that I tried made for messy water and scattered, dirty food.

    Edit: Actually, mine are an inch or two higher than their backs, and they have to stretch their necks a little bit to reach the waterer and feeder that are hanging on small chains.

    Doing that, making them stretch, wont hurt them and keeps the from making a mess.
    I hang my feeders from an adjustable cleat, like you would use for a tent stay. Then I can raise and lower them easily.

    I just put a double hook on each chain, but they're always falling out when I remove the container(s); probably, I should squeeze the end that's on the chain shut permanently. I don't understand what you mean by "adjustable cleat". (?)
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2008
  10. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    Leesville, SC
    These things go by many names - Tent adjusters, stay adjusters, line cleats, etc.
    To make and use them, follow these directions:

    1. Get a 4" x 1" x 1" piece of scrap wood.
    2. Drill a 3/8-1/2" hole, 1/2" from either end.
    3. Run your rope through one of the holes and tie a big knot so it wont pull back through.
    4. Run the tag end of the rope back through the other hole to create a loop.
    5. Tie or attach the tag end to your feeder bail handle. Like you, I have an "S" hook on the end I bent from stiff wire. Leave plenty of extra rope beyond the hook to adjust for height.
    6. Hang the loop itself from your nail, hook or whatever overhead fixture you are hanging the feeder from.
    7. Suspend the feeder from the other end, off the floor, allowing it's weight to pull on the rope. Step back and observe. The cleat should be pulled perpendicular with the floor by the feeders' weight, leaving the cleat tight to the rope.
    8. If needed, adjust height of the feeder by grasping the wooden cleat and turning it parallel with the ground. This will free the loop. Adjust the length/size of the loop to get the feeder where you want it. Now release the cleat, so the weight of the feeder pulls the cleat perpendicular to the ground again - thus locking the cleat with the feeder at the desired height.
    9. Cut off the excess rope at the bail hook.

    If this doesnt help, Ill get a pic.

    Here are some rope cleats you can buy, if you want to spend the money. Same principle, fancied up:
    http://www.rei.com/product/358151

    More fancy, costs more. This you could easily make from hardwood, such as pallet scraps:
    http://www.mountainhomemarketing.com/mhm_072807_005.htm

    Weren't you ever a Boy Scout?
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2008

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