Hello

Boutinc

Chirping
Sep 15, 2019
13
59
51
My name is Carla. I decided I would love to have a flock of 12 gurls and researched rather rigorously before reinforcing the dog kennel in the backyard of my new home. I live in Massachusetts and we get tons of snow and winters are pretty vicious at times. I have already purchased a large heated waterer but worry about them being out there with no heater. My main reason in getting them is to have all the fresh eggs but, without heat will egg production plummet?
 

Attachments

  • 7A98B7D7-DEC5-4416-9457-4AE72A322B76.jpeg
    7A98B7D7-DEC5-4416-9457-4AE72A322B76.jpeg
    592.3 KB · Views: 8

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
Premium Feather Member
Jul 23, 2018
31,918
258,617
1,642
NY Southern Tier
My Coop
My Coop
Hello, Carla, and welcome to BYC! :frow Glad you joined.
As long as your coop is kept DRY with lots of ventilation, they will not need supplemental heat.
As mentioned, light is what keeps them producing eggs although any source of stress will cause a drop off.
If you have pullets, they will continue to lay well throughout the winter regardless of the shortened days. Hens will moult in the fall and likely take a break during winter where they will produce very few eggs.
I am in the "no supplemental light" camp as I feel that it is very hard on their bodies to produce eggs all year, then replace all their feathers and then force them to get right back to laying eggs again with no break. They are animals. Not machines.
 

Pork Pie

Flockwit
Premium Feather Member
6 Years
Jan 30, 2015
57,471
233,759
1,687

Boutinc

Chirping
Sep 15, 2019
13
59
51
Hello, Carla, and welcome to BYC! :frow Glad you joined.
As long as your coop is kept DRY with lots of ventilation, they will not need supplemental heat.
As mentioned, light is what keeps them producing eggs although any source of stress will cause a drop off.
If you have pullets, they will continue to lay well throughout the winter regardless of the shortened days. Hens will moult in the fall and likely take a break during winter where they will produce very few eggs.
I am in the "no supplemental light" camp as I feel that it is very hard on their bodies to produce eggs all year, then replace all their feathers and then force them to get right back to laying eggs again with no break. They are animals. Not machines.
I posted a picture of the beautiful coop they live in. I can no longer let them free range as a neighbor complaint left me with no choice to leave them inside. There is plenty if room and it’s very enforced so no worries about predators. I closed the window all but a couple inches yesterday. It stays very dry inside and they seem happy now after days of screaming when I had to keep them inside. I was SO SAD
 

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
Premium Feather Member
Jul 23, 2018
31,918
258,617
1,642
NY Southern Tier
My Coop
My Coop
I posted a picture of the beautiful coop they live in. I can no longer let them free range as a neighbor complaint left me with no choice to leave them inside. There is plenty if room and it’s very enforced so no worries about predators. I closed the window all but a couple inches yesterday. It stays very dry inside and they seem happy now after days of screaming when I had to keep them inside. I was SO SAD
:hugs
I know how you feel. I had to confine mine to a pen. It's about 1/3 acre but the flock had been accustomed to going wherever they wanted. They were just going to far and, to me, being a nuisance and definitely putting themselves in danger of getting hit by a car or taken by a predator.
When they were first put in the pen, they kept flying up to the gate tops and jumping over. They all got wing clips and pouted for weeks about their new prison. I've since built a new coop and huge run inside the pen and added another planting arrangement and they have all gotten used to their new home and seem to really enjoy it.
It takes time. It was definitely harder on me than them. But now, I couldn't imagine letting them out and allowing them the same level of risk. I think it's a great compromise. You will get used to your flock being confined to their run long after they do!
 

Boutinc

Chirping
Sep 15, 2019
13
59
51
Hello, Carla, and welcome to BYC! :frow Glad you joined.
As long as your coop is kept DRY with lots of ventilation, they will not need supplemental heat.
As mentioned, light is what keeps them producing eggs although any source of stress will cause a drop off.
If you have pullets, they will continue to lay well throughout the winter regardless of the shortened days. Hens will moult in the fall and likely take a break during winter where they will produce very few eggs.
I am in the "no supplemental light" camp as I feel that it is very hard on their bodies to produce eggs all year, then replace all their feathers and then force them to get right back to laying eggs again with no break. They are animals. Not machines.
I definitely do not want them to stress and will let the light be what it is without adding additional. The heater for the water will be inside the coop to keep it protected from the elements. I agree they are animals and just want to keep them happy.
 

Boutinc

Chirping
Sep 15, 2019
13
59
51
:hugs
I know how you feel. I had to confine mine to a pen. It's about 1/3 acre but the flock had been accustomed to going wherever they wanted. They were just going to far and, to me, being a nuisance and definitely putting themselves in danger of getting hit by a car or taken by a predator.
When they were first put in the pen, they kept flying up to the gate tops and jumping over. They all got wing clips and pouted for weeks about their new prison. I've since built a new coop and huge run inside the pen and added another planting arrangement and they have all gotten used to their new home and seem to really enjoy it.
It takes time. It was definitely harder on me than them. But now, I couldn't imagine letting them out and allowing them the same level of risk. I think it's a great compromise. You will get used to your flock being confined to their run long after they do!
Yes I agree. I do feel better knowing they are safe in there. I also found a nest if eggs behind our shed so now I no longer have to worry about that either. I just wanted them to be able to eat all the bugs. Ticks are bad living near the woods. I also don’t miss poop being everywhere.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom