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HELP!!----How much is too much?????

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by ShanCarl1971, Jul 18, 2011.

  1. ShanCarl1971

    ShanCarl1971 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 23, 2011
    I have two set of "babies" that I need to integrate. The older ones are 14 weeks old, and the younger ones are about 11 weeks old. The younger ones have been in the run, seperated, for about 4 weeks now. When I let them out with the older girls, the younger ones are picked on relentlessly! The older ones are jumping on them, pulling feathers from the backs of their necks, etc. How much is too much of this stuff??? I just don't know where to draw the line or when to intervene. All the younger ones want to do is get back into their space!! But, the older ones just follow!

    Also, since my older girls just spent their first night in their new coop, should I consider putting the younger ones in there to sleep to speed the process, since it's brand new to ALL of them?????

    Aaaaaggghhhh!!! I didn't expect it to be this hard since they are all so young!!!!
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Usually "too much" is drawing blood -- but if they pull more than a feather or two, I'd probably consider that too much. Probably best to wait til they are all full size if it doesn't go well.
     
  3. sunnyvera

    sunnyvera Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would suggest making sure the younger ones have places to hide and run behind. A wide open run with no places to hide can spell trouble - epecially if one gets cornered. We have straw bales and tree stumps in the run and made places to run and escape to. They feel safer and over time they get used to each other. It works for us.
     
  4. sunlitmoonlight

    sunlitmoonlight Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 20, 2010
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    I have 19 chicks with 4 hens; 3 different ages in the chicks. 10 chicks are 4 weeks old (2 hens), 6 chicks are 2 weeks old (1 hen) and 3 chicks are 1,5 weeks old. All bantams. Also have two 13 week old blue silkie chicks which I rescued.

    They are currently in the horse stable as it is cooler and with so many chicks hatching within days of each other, I thought they would have more space. The horses are out on grass [​IMG]

    I have straw bales as beds. The hen with the 3 youngest chicks has her own area at night as the other hens pick on her (always have). The rest are able to roam free.

    I noticed that every morning when I let them all out (they free range), there were blue feathers all over the place. After some investigation and "spying", I realised that my precious blue silkies were being picked on.

    I now have 3 branches of different sizes scattered on the floor, so if any hens or chicks get chased by another, they have plenty of room to run and hide. The amount of blue feathers now found each morning are minimal.

    I have sinced watched quietly from a distance, and noticed that when the silkies are chased, they run behind the branches and this stops the chase [​IMG]

    So, maybe this solution will help you?
     
  5. ShanCarl1971

    ShanCarl1971 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 23, 2011
    The younger ones are pretty close to the size of the older ones ........ I will definitely try the "obstacles" this evening ....... Oh MY!!.......I have to do this again with another EE and three silkies!!!!!

    Anyone have an opinion on putting them all into the new coop together at night????
     
  6. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    Put the obstacles in there, boxes, ladders, old branches, I have had very good success storing my wire cage in there kittycorner to a corner, not up tight, but with a narrow opening, on each edge. cement blocks work well on their sides for baby chicks.

    Then put all together at night.
    It will get better. often I will let the older ones outside the run, for a few days, and then put the chicks in the run, so they can get acclaimated and find all the hideouts.

    MrsK
     

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