HELP! HUMIDITY!

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Goatmama123, Nov 6, 2015.

  1. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    I wasn't correcting spelling- I don't correct spelling unless changing the spelling is changing the whole instrument/meaning. [​IMG] I did have a disclaimer in my sig about my spelling/typing. Maybe I should put it back.
     
  2. Ur-ur-ur-urrr

    Ur-ur-ur-urrr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I suppose I misinterpreted your all-caps HYGROMETER. In forums, all-caps is considered yelling, and it appeared you were trying to embarrass me for mistyping the word. As a former super-moderator for an international help forum, I have a knack for spotting these things. I'm new to this hobby, and I have much to learn. I joined this site because I've heard it's the best poultry site around. I expect to make mistakes in my posts, and sometimes it's nearly impossible to decipher my cryptic writing. However, I don't want to feel like I'm being chastised for doing so. Subtle nuances, with a touch of tact, work much better at settling differences. That said, I would like to apologize for my outburst.

    In retrospect... it would be a bit weird if someone attempted to use a hydrometer to check humidity. [​IMG]
     
  3. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    I capped to note the difference, because there are so many newbies that something as simple as a difference between hygrometer and hydrometer will send them looking for and possibly purchasing the wrong instrument. Was not ment to embarrass you and I am truely sorry if you felt that was my intention, it was not. As for mistakes, like I said, I previously had a disclaimmer, (not kidding) in my siggy about typos and misspellings. I'm awful at them, especially since I bought the new lap top. Keys are awful compared to the old ones. I spend more time correcting my typing than typing what I want to say.

    BYC is an excellent source of help and discussions. I am truely sorry if I came off tactless. I may have been a bit sensative about the dry incubation.... [​IMG] Let's start again....

    [​IMG] I'm Amy...I have great success with dry or low humidity incubations and would love to help answer any questions or concerns you or any one may have regarding low humidity incubations and how to monitor air cells. (I don't weigh, so I'm not much help there excepting repeating what I have read. lol)
     
  4. Ur-ur-ur-urrr

    Ur-ur-ur-urrr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm Joey, and it's very nice to meet you, Amy. Sometimes "bumpy" introductions can turn into great relationships... lol! I look forward to learning from your, and all the others, experience(s) and expertise. [​IMG]
     
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  5. Ur-ur-ur-urrr

    Ur-ur-ur-urrr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I recently read a post by Matt1616 where he mentioned his incubation method of using 50% humidity from start to finish. He hatches thousands of eggs with great success each year, and called lockdown an "internet sensation". That simple phrase will cause me to remember that post, and it's message, from now on. My brain is wired to use triggers like that to burn info into memory. Otherwise, everything gets thrown into File 13...
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2015
  6. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    A lot will depend on what kind of incubator one is using as well. When you say, thousands of eggs, I would assume that he probably hatches in a cabinet incubator and if that is the case 50% is more understandable. 50% in a styro bator or small homemade has a higher probability of keeping the eggs from loosing enough moisture and compromising a hatch. Variables such as hatcher habits will also play a big role, especially at hatch. I use 75% at hatch because I am a meddler. I open my bator at hatch-frequently. So the higher humidity gives me assurance that the membranes won't dry as quickly during my meddling. Someone that is strictly hands off and doesn't touch anything until the end of the hatch can certainly run a lower humidity with the same success. I partially agree with lockdown though. The only thing lockdown changes for me is "last" candle and highering humidity in prep for hatching. I stop turning my eggs at day 14, instead of the more popular day 18 and I stopped using a turner, so my eggs are already laying flat.
     
  7. Ur-ur-ur-urrr

    Ur-ur-ur-urrr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I didn't think about that, but a cabinet incubator probably doesn't need that much humidity, especially at hatch time. Humidity will spike automatically once a bunch of the eggs start hatching. At the most, I'll be using the lowest end of the "Incubation Period" on the hygrometer that came on my new Incuveiw bator. I'll also cross-reference it with the hygrometer on my IncuTherm Plus... once I've performed the salt test on it. If I can get the analog hygromether off of the incubator without destroying it, I'll test both of them at the same time. I've already performed the ice water test on the IncuTherm Plus, and it registered 32.2F, so it's pretty accurate. I need to calibrate the thermometer on the Incuveiw to match it... less .2F... but I have to wait until the replacement power supply comes, which will be Monday. Grrrrr!

    I don't intend to meddle much, except to move the chicks to the brooder once they've dried (or died). Yeah... I'm realistic. Of course, the number of eggs and the length of hatching period will determine how much I have to be in and out of the bator. I intend for it to be as little as possible, however, I may have to handcuff my wife when they start pipping and zipping... lol!

    PS: I never understood why they label some egg movers as "turners", when in reality, they're egg "tilters".
     
  8. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Yes, woman seem to have a harder time being hands off than men...lol For me it's impossible, I don't even try. I'd probably have a nervous breakdown if I forced it....lol I just take precautions to compensate my meddlesome behaviors...lol I do plan to be less hands on during incubation when I attempt the shipped eggs next spring. Less candling and "checking". I plan to incubate upright in egg cartons and try to stick to day 7/14/18 candling. Unless of course they arrive in perfect condition (hahahaha!) and no loose air cells.....lol

    I guess they figure they are turning from right to left. The thing I don't like about the turners-at least the ones for the styro bators are the amount of heat that the motors put off. I had one hatch that I had a full tray. The eggs closest to the motor developed (and died) at a rapid rate. That's when I took the turner out and stopped using it. The last two hatches were w/o the use of the turner and they were my best two rates yet. Turning by hand also feeds my need to "do something" during incubation other than check gages to make sure temp and humidity is good.

    When do you plan to set your first batch?
     
  9. Ur-ur-ur-urrr

    Ur-ur-ur-urrr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've noticed that about most women... always having to do the touchy-feely thing... LOL! It's perfectly okay... if it feels right, do it. In the perfect world, shipped eggs would receive the golden treatment... white gloves and all. In the real world, boxes get tossed, dropped, and banged around. It's a wonder any of those eggs ever make it to maturity. When we come up with a way to levitate eggs inside a shipping container, all our problems will be solved. I'll get to work on that right away... [​IMG]

    Hmm... I guess changing the angle could count as "turning". I wouldn't think that a 1 rpm motor would generate enough heat to be considered negligible, much less detrimental to hatch rate... especially in a forced-air incubator. Then again, I've never incubated a clutch of eggs before, so what do I know? Nada. Just basing my theory on my bleak knowledge of electronics.

    I had hoped to set my first batch today, but the faulty power supply added another week to my plan. It's okay, because I needed to check out the equipment, and calibrate the thermometers and hygrometers. Like a fool, I would have trusted the equipment as it was, and probably bombed on my first attempt to incubate. I now know better, and will be running tests at least twice a year. I want to set them next Fri or Sat, so someone will be home to witness the hatching. I'm home Sat and Sun, and my wife is home Mon and Tue. Theoretically, if I set them on Sat, both of us should be able to see (at least) a chick or two hatching out.
     
  10. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    I don't know about the other incubator turners, but the styro ones, such as the Little Giants throw off a lot of heat from the motor. If you touch the motor unit, it's not much cooler than touching the heating element for the bator. When you take the tray out for hatch, you normally have to adjust for the heat loss. I had one thermometer (I use three accurate therms), and had it placed by the motor. It was about 2 degrees higher in the area of the motor.

    Forced air doesn't mean even air. I still have hot/cold spots in my bator. Directly under my heating unit it is 1-2 degrees warmer than the outer edges and the center of my bator. Also, if egg placement is not somewhat even, (significant difference in mass distribution), it'll cause one side of my bator to run significantly hotter.
     

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