HELP Needed...My Rooster REPEATEDLY ATTACKED ME

Boomerwaffen

Chirping
Jun 28, 2021
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I am not a person who would use a foot or a broom. I have never offered a foot or a broom, they think that is something to attack and will do so if you offer it. I do not let them sneak up on me, I also try and pick up my roosters if they get near. My current rooster will not let me hold him, unless I take him off the roost, but he knows if he gets near me I will pick him up. Some roosters liked being held. I adopted a rooster that was attacking a grandmother and grandson. When he came to my house he tried it once. I picked him up. Then he only came to be picked up never attacked again. You do have to not show fear as you pick them up though.
Exactly you are the King there can be no doubt. Confusion and uncertainty causes one’s own demise. The roosters are very funny creatures. I like your strategy. I’m stealing it…
;-)
 

Boomerwaffen

Chirping
Jun 28, 2021
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110
86
It is interesting you say you picked up a rooster that was attacking you. A rooster attacked me once and there was no way I could have "picked him up" while this was going on. It was all I could do to protect myself, much less try and get hold of him.
Hehe they are funny animals. They flew the second they realize things aren’t going their way. If you’re concerned about getting hurt grabbing them, get a large fishing dip net with a long handle. They’re fast so this helps a lot. It’s quite a workout chasing a large rooster around a run. Plus I don’t want to hurt a bird. The dip net solves the problem. Plus they’ll be too freaked out to attack you when you reach in to get him. But they have to know, if they attack you they’re getting picked up. Works great. Lamar hasn’t attacked me since. But he attacked a contractor the other day who just swatted him away gently.
 

Sally PB

Crossing the Road
Premium Feather Member
Aug 7, 2020
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I picked him up. Then he only came to be picked up never attacked again. You do have to not show fear as you pick them up though.

It is interesting you say you picked up a rooster that was attacking you. A rooster attacked me once and there was no way I could have "picked him up" while this was going on. It was all I could do to protect myself, much less try and get hold of him.
I'm at my wits end with my roo. (I've been reading up on the broomstick method, so it's getting serious.)

So, @gimmie birdies, how do you pick up the rooster who's attacking you? Mine comes at me head down, pecks me, then jumps back. Today he's crossed a line: He came at my hand as I was setting a bowl of feed down. I have a good bruise on my hand.

After I set the other bowls down, I faced him, waited until he was contemplating my feet again, and then held him down. I put his face in the dirt. He struggled, I waited. He calmed down. I waited a bit more. Yup, he struggled again. We went through this three times with me holding him down before I let him up.

He's a big guy, a 19 month old Buff Orpington. Just how do you hold him, so that he's under control? I wear garden gloves when I go in, so I won't have a great grip. I'm not going to try it bare handed; he would have broken the skin on my hand today.

I'm willing to try working with him a bit more. He had a "butthead spell" last summer for a couple weeks, and then seemed to chill out. He's getting more aggressive now, though, so he's gonna have to change his tune quickly.
 
Nov 11, 2020
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If they're close enough to attack you they're close enough to grab by both legs. After you grab one leg grab the other then yank the rooster off the ground by both legs before he can hurt you. They hate being picked up by the legs worse than being held or carried.I don't recommend you carry a rooster by the legs! Once you've caught him put him in crate (like any bully hen) A couple days will teach him to respect you . (in front of the flock) Older roosters understand the hierarchy and pecking order of the flock better than a young one.
 
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Sally PB

Crossing the Road
Premium Feather Member
Aug 7, 2020
9,285
41,792
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Belding, MI
Holding my roo down with his beak in the dirt hasn't taught him to respect me. I will try the holding/carrying next. I'm thinking that he is going to have to go, though.

That makes me sad. Except for when I'm holding the butthead off with the rooster stick.
 

Boomerwaffen

Chirping
Jun 28, 2021
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I think you’re doing the right thing. Mine calmed down after two treatments. The second one I got the other birds in the coop and had him in the enclosed yard. It’s big so he was hard to catch. But the scared the heck out of him and he started screaming bloody murder emitting distress calls so loud even our gander Tony started calling out. So I pinned him first in the run alone. Then I took him in to the coop and did it. Clearly thought he got what he deserved so he started chasing him around too. Very satisfying to watch. Tony won’t hurt the other birds but he’s massive and corrals Lamar easily with his wings. If it happens again I’ve got a large long handled dip net I’ll use on him to speed up the capture process, and get straight to domination. ;-)
 

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