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Help on 50 bird coop 10'x25' with breeding in mind.

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Cody A, Sep 20, 2014.

  1. Cody A

    Cody A Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 20, 2014
    N. Louisiana
    Hi all,
    I'm in N. Louisiana and planning on trying to raise Buckeyes. I'm going to free range the birds as much as possible but will have to predator proof them at night.
    I've been reading a lot on the forum and can't seem to find the answer I'm looking for. The forum is so massive. After spending hours here I've decided to ask for help. I've become extremely frustrated with how to design this because I know nothing about chickens. :)
    I'm trying to design with the future in mind.

    I'm ready to start building a coop for about 50 birds for meat and egg production. I'm planning on pouring a concrete slab 10'x25' with a shed roof that will extend into the run 6'-8' for extra cover for shade and to prevent rain from blowing in the coop. The coop will be three sided(open air will face south) with a 25'x50' run. Basically a 25' long building with a 50' deep run attached to it. So here is were my questions begin.
    If I want to selectively breed specific birds what do I need to do? How do I design for breeding in the future. Is the design above good to start with or should I change this?
     
  2. chikkenfriend

    chikkenfriend Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 2, 2013
    Texas
    My Coop
    That's a big coop! Best of luck to ya! I've had chickens for about a year and a half and have raised a few clutches. Here are a few things to think about.

    1. Broody hens don't get along too well with others. A separate area for them will ensure happy mommas.

    2. Big birds pick on little ones. We have a coop for mature birds, a coop for adolescents, and one just for brooding. Separate runs, or sectioned off runs will keep your young 'uns from getting beat up.

    3. We had a bit of a pecking problem until I put in multiple feeding stations. Make sure there are feeders and waterers for each group. Less fighting that way.

    4. Concrete floor? With something that big and lots of birds, this could be a problem. Walking in too much moisture/poop can lead to Footpad Dermititis. And if the roosts are too high, bumblefoot too. If they free range, it reduces the risk some, as long as they have nice shady areas to hang out in outside. Otherwise, they'll hang out in the coop. I've read a lot about using sand or dirt floors. My next coop will be sand floor.

    All the best to ya! And welcome to BYC! :welcome
     
  3. Cody A

    Cody A Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 20, 2014
    N. Louisiana
    Hi chickenfriend thank you for the tips.

    I was planning to put a few inches of sand over the concrete. I'm not completely sold on the concrete floor as of yet. It just seems to be easier
    than sand over dirt when it comes to cleaning and with the benefits of staying dry and predator proof.

    So if I split the coop and run into two or three sections I guess that would mean some of the birds stay in them all the time and don't get to FR if I only have one area for them to FR in.
    Is this correct?
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  4. chikkenfriend

    chikkenfriend Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    Not necessarily. We free range all of our birds. All are free on ALL of our land and all together. They cover about 6 - 8 acres. BUT...

    A new clutch needs to be kept away (and safe) from the others until chicks are hatched and old enough. A Broody will need some privacy for a few weeks, etc... It isn't a permanent thing. You just need to be able to separate as needed.

    New birds should be quarantined until you're sure they aren't carrying anything that could harm your existing flock. And, God forbid, if one gets sick, you'll need to quarantine there too.

    Would concrete drain as well as dirt? It would if you put an incline in it. But it poses a much greater risk of Bumblefoot than dirt would if it ever became exposed. But if your sand layer is thick, that wouldn't be very likely, would it? The predator proof part is a VERY good point, though. Definitely a good reason to consider concrete.

    So it comes down to flexibility. The purpose is to have areas that you can close off if and when it becomes necessary.

    Best of cluck to ya!
     
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    Are you going to raise meat birds just for butcher or are you just going to eat the cockerels you hatch?

    Plan on having as many separate enclosures with runs as possible, with the option of combining spaces.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. Cody A

    Cody A Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 20, 2014
    N. Louisiana
    Chickenfriend I've decided to go with sand or deep litter for the floor. :)

    @ aart. Well I'm not sure. I'm learning so I assumed I'd be eating the cockerels and some of the hens at some point.

    Since this is my first "chicken run" I think this is gonna evolve as time goes by :) I'm getting the points of sectioning things off for various reasons. :)
     
    1 person likes this.

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