Help Please! What are they doing?!?!?!

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by love-my-wolves, Mar 19, 2008.

  1. love-my-wolves

    love-my-wolves Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 14, 2008
    Front Royal, VA
    Ok, my 1 week old babies have dug a huge hole in their bedding!!! All 3 are fighting to make it wider, digging and pecking at the hole! They've never done anything like this before! They keep pecking at the bottom, but I've checked and see nothing of interest (to me anyway) Is this normal? I'm so nervous that something is amiss!
     
  2. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Forks, Virginia
    Chicks scratch and dig. It is normal. They make holes and lay in them, wallow in them, sleep in them, dust bathe in them. It's normal. Jut watch them and you will see a pattern develop.
     
    andreanar and Elyrian1 like this.
  3. love-my-wolves

    love-my-wolves Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 14, 2008
    Front Royal, VA
    Whew! Thank goodness!! They've never done this before, and seemed soooooo obsessed. I pictured 3 OCD chickens! [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  4. Tane Z

    Tane Z Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 23, 2017
    I'm so very glad to see that it isn't just me that has noticed this. My baby's are one week three days old and have started digging holes with their feet and pecking at anything and everything. Currently there are two holes. There was a third but in the process of creating the second hole, they covered the third. I did notice they lay and sleep or chill in them. One almost flew out of their two feet deep box I have them in. I'm so proud of her!!
     
  5. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Dec 11, 2009
    Colorado Rockies
    If it's a nice day, around 70F or warmer, no wind, you may take your one-week, two-week, or three-week old chicks outside to play. Let them have some dirt to scratch in and they will likely dig a hole and dirt bathe in it. Give them a runway of space and they will show you they know how to fly.

    Three-week and four-week olds will last all day without chilling, but you need to keep a close eye on the younger ones. At the first sign of huddling, you'll need to return them to their heat source.
     
  6. Tane Z

    Tane Z Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 23, 2017

    Thanks for the information. I live in west Texas so it's usually 71 at three in the morning. lol I know I'm not supposed to let them get wet yet and we've had rain off and on for the last week. They got to play in the run yesterday when we put the coop and run together and loved it. I felt so bad for taking them out and bringing them back in. They were flapping their wings and pecking and chasing black ants. It was adorable!!!
     

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  7. BirdHead

    BirdHead Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 3, 2015
    Southern Oklahoma
    They're just curious to as what's under the straw.

    I have to cover holes weekly in the hen coops as they love making foot deep holes to bathe and to lounge in.
     
  8. Tane Z

    Tane Z Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 23, 2017
    Okay so I should have dirt piles located near the coop to refill holes. Noted. I'm so curious to see what they do as they get older.
     
  9. BirdHead

    BirdHead Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 3, 2015
    Southern Oklahoma
    Mine remind me of cats, why? Cuz they act nothing like it but mine are sweet and fluffy and like being petted lol
     
  10. BirdHead

    BirdHead Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Southern Oklahoma
    Oh and starting now until they're about 6-8 months old is when you should really be attentive to them, hold them (not too much or for long periods, can actually make em sick) hand feed them. Everything you can to make them human friendly and so they know your momma and when you come out they gonna wanna see whatcha got for them today lol
     

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