Help with guinea keet - dirty belly and butt

champignon

In the Brooder
Jul 28, 2018
9
3
14
Hi all. I posted about this yesterday in the guinea fowl forum, but thought maybe I might get more response here.

I have six 9 or 10-day old keets (exact hatch day uncertain, purchased from feed store).

On days 5-7 a few of them had pasty butt but that seemed to clear up after I stopped using the pine shavings the feed store sold me as bedding.

Everyone is eating, drinking, making happy sounds, and alternating between running around and napping. None of them are acting like they don't feel well. However...

Friday night I noticed this one with a dirty butt/belly (pictures show before and after cleaning). The poop is NOT thick and crusted onto the vent, so this seems different from the earlier pasty butt. All the other keets have clean, fluffy bellies.

pre.jpg postclean.jpg

I separated this one from the others yesterday and began giving Corid in water (to everybody, at 2 tsp per gallon). It's the only thing I could find at my Tractor Supply that seemed possibly helpful. I did not see any poultry antibiotics at my Tractor Supply. My livestock vet specializes in ruminants, but maybe I can get something from her, if recommended.

The poops in the separated one's enclosure do not look highly abnormal (compared with the poops in the other enclosure anyway---I have very limited experience here!), but there's often very white, wet-looking poop on its butt when I check.

This morning, it looks like a second keet might be developing whatever this is. I'm monitoring but I'm not sure yet.

Does anyone recognize this and know what to do about it?

The one keet who is separated seems really stressed out about being alone (lots of loud calling). If the second keet really is developing the same thing, I will put it in with the other, but at that point, haven't they all been exposed and is separation worth it?

Thanks for any help or advice...

Additional info:
The keets have heat bulbs keeping one end of their enclosures at 90F. They are on paper towels, which are changed 2 or 3 times a day. They have grit and are eating ground up game bird starter (28% protein). Last Wednesday I began giving them clover and grass clippings. Today I gave them their first mealworms, which was extremely exciting for everyone, including DirtyBelly here.
 

50-45-1

Crowing
11 Years
I would put the second keet in with the first one as being alone is stressing him more. I have never had a problem with chicks or keets in brooder boxes with the pine shavings. I am wondering if the Area you are concerned about has a layer of film or membraine from hatching that did not separate when he came out of the egg.
I had that happen to me once with a chick that had a piece of membraine on the side of her face and neck. Looks awful, but so close behind her eye i dared not try to soak it off. Plus it would have chilled her so i just watched and it flaked off with the sprouting down an just a few days. I dont think your keet is sick and needing medicine. Good luck and keep us updated. I LOVE GUINEAS!
 

champignon

In the Brooder
Jul 28, 2018
9
3
14
Here is the keet I separated, taken this afternoon. Super cute new tail feathers but super yukky butt.

IMG_20180729_175029795~2.jpg

And this is where it pooped on the sink after I bathed its butt (while I was blow drying):

IMG_20180729_184312923~2.jpg
 

champignon

In the Brooder
Jul 28, 2018
9
3
14
Just following up on the outcome of this.

I ended up putting this little one back in with the other keets since it was so stressed out. I started (and finished) a round of Corid in their water. Since there was white foamy stuff on the vent that reminded me of some pics I was seeing of vent gleet, I also began applying antifungal Clotrimazole cream (from CVS) twice a day.

None of the other keets got sick. This one slowly got better. It was smaller than the other keets at the time, but it has now caught up with the others and I can no longer tell it apart from the other 5 coral blue keets.
 
Top Bottom