Help with windy run

WalnutTree

Songster
Jun 26, 2020
148
444
151
WA Seattle
My chickens have been in their new coop for about three weeks now, and it has gotten as low as the 30's already!! :th
They refuse to leave their little coop to go out into then run and eat/drink/forage!
They only come out when I'm in the run and when I leave they go right back to the coop :barnie
I'm worried they won't eat/drink properly if this goes on (especially in winter when it's real windy). Right now I have their old chick feeder in there so they're at least eating something, but does anyone know how I can solve this predicament?
 

U_Stormcrow

Free Ranging
Jun 7, 2020
4,674
13,644
536
North FL Panhandle Region / Wiregrass
In case it wasn't clear. Pictures. Ages. Dimensions.

There are some easy fixes - the theory is the same regardless - but which fix is best requires details not yet provided.

Also, you should look up the direction of your prevailing winter winds - because those are the ones most concerning to you.

A source like this tells us that Seattle area tends to be wettest and most windy in November to early December, and that the winds in that time period are primarily from the south and south east - so those are the sides of your run you need to focus on.

When you post pictures, please indicate those directions for our reference.

Thank you for helping us help you.
 

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Jul 3, 2016
17,888
35,852
1,062
WA, Pac NW
My Coop
My Coop
Chickens don't like the super high winds we've been getting the last couple of days, so some sort of windblock/barricade is a good idea to encourage them to come out. Most of my flock has been huddling in my old brooder (which I leave open for stormy weather) or next to it, whenever the wind picks up, as the wood helps blunt the winds.
 

K0k0shka

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
Jul 24, 2019
3,371
9,030
487
Boston Area, MA
My Coop
My Coop
Add a windbreak of some sort. Tarps are quick, cheap and easy, but they block out the light and it can get dark inside, especially with the weak winter sun. Not to mention they're ugly :lol: Some people use clear shower curtains or painter's plastic sheets to wrap around their run as a wind block. They can rip easily though, especially if you have high winds. What I do is I screw clear polycarbonate panels into the wooden frame of the run, wrapping the run on all sides, and it stays like that until springtime. My run is only partially covered on top (has welded wire everywhere for protection, but rain cover on only about half of it) so they still get fresh air. Don't seal it too tightly or it will sweat and freeze. You need ventilation. I like the polycarbonate panels because they are clear and I can see through them, light can get in, they are reusable indefinitely, very durable, they don't flop in the wind or get blown open, and they keep the run nice and cozy.

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K0k0shka

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
Jul 24, 2019
3,371
9,030
487
Boston Area, MA
My Coop
My Coop
While I do think a wind block is necessary, remember that the chicks have only been in the coop for a few weeks. It took mine many weeks to get comfortable going outside.
Very true. They will freak and pout at any kind of new or unpleasant weather. Some things they can get used to, other things... they may never get used to (like snow, if you get any). Things like wind blocks and rain covers help a great deal with that. And also, spending time with them outside (as much time as you can spare) so they can get used to it and see that it's not so scary.
 

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