Hen sitting down, won't get up? help!?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ms.cluckling, Oct 14, 2012.

  1. ms.cluckling

    ms.cluckling Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My favorite and most active hen, Dot, was fine yesterday. But this morning, we went to open the chicken coop, and she didn't jump out as she usually does. She just sat there, so we had to carry her out, and put her on the ground. she stood there a long time, then just sat down. She's now sitting in a newspaper lined box. we separated her from the rest of the chickens. Her tail is down, I'm not sure if that means anything, but her tail is always straight as an arrow.

    I don't know what other information you're supposed to include but some general things--

    she's an EE; about 1 and a half years old; lives with 2 other hens, a rooster, and 2 chicks whose gender is undecided.
    she's never had any other problems other than being picked on by the other hens occasionally. She lives outside as a free range chicken, but at night stays in a wooden coop with the other adult chickens.

    Thank you in advance!
     
  2. ms.cluckling

    ms.cluckling Chillin' With My Peeps

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    please help;...
     
  3. MarineCorpFarmr

    MarineCorpFarmr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Any signs of sickness?
     
  4. ms.cluckling

    ms.cluckling Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm not entirely sure. She's just not moving around. and she's very quiet.
     
  5. MarineCorpFarmr

    MarineCorpFarmr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Check the eyes crop and nostrils for anything out of the ordinary.
     
  6. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Visually inspect her for lice/mites. Also she may be eggbound. If this is the case, put her in a container of warm water up to her sides and gently massage her underside for about 20 minutes while she's soaking. The warm water will relax her and expand her innards, massaging her underside will help move the egg along. Then put on a disposable glove and put some olive oil on your finger and insert your finger into her vent checking for debris. Remove your finger and put a little olive oil just inside the vent. Inserting your finger inside the vent will stretch her and the olive oil will make it easier for her to lay the egg. Soak her in the warm water as necessary. Hopefully she'll lay the stuck egg if that's what it is.
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    If she were mine, I'd put her someplace with access to a heatlamp, food and water. I would also dust for mites and do a thorough exam... Weigh, check for cuts, bruises, lumps, crop fullness, abdominal masses, poop status, comb color, skin color, etc.
     
  8. ms.cluckling

    ms.cluckling Chillin' With My Peeps

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    how can you check for mites?
     
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Look between the feathers and on the feathers for very small bugs. They really like the vent area, legs and under the wings. Sometimes I check mine, but can't find any, so I dust them anyway, place the hen on some paper towels, come back in 30 minutes and I usually find some. I should add that you should dust for mites after doing your thorough exam.
     
  10. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Lice are whittish in color and are fast movers. Mites look like pepper and are slow movers or not moving at all, they are usually too busy sucking blood. Here's a link to help you identify external parasites (w/ pics.)
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ig140
     

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