Hens and hen house size

L0laCh1ck3n

In the Brooder
Jun 10, 2016
11
0
12
Found a great deal for a coop from tsc. Houses up to 6 chickens
Size: 73 in. x 38.25 in. x 46 in.

It comes with 10 hens. Would it be okay to keep all 10 hens if they will only be pinned up during the night hours? There is also two runs that go with it that are 55 in. x 33.25 in. x 24.25 in.

So even when they are locked in they will have a decent run area.

Here is the product from tsc website.

400
 

Pyxis

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I'm betting those measurements are for the full thing and not just the upstairs inside part. If that's the case, it's definitely not big enough to house ten hens and not even big enough for six. You need four square feet of indoor coop space per bird. That thing is probably big enough for three hens maybe (assuming that the top coop part extends over half the run, which seems to be the case from pictures).

Even if they're only in there at night, that's a really tight squeeze. I'm not sure how I see that ten birds could comfortably roost in a 12 square foot space. There's probably actually not enough roost area either.

Additionally, you need ten square feet of run space per chicken, which is 100 square feet for ten birds, so even with the added runs you don't have that kind of space.
 
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L0laCh1ck3n

In the Brooder
Jun 10, 2016
11
0
12
Nuts looks like I would have to get ridbof some birds. The whole thing is only $40. So it is a huge bargain.
 

junebuggena

Crowing
Apr 17, 2015
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Long Beach, WA
$40 for 10 hens is a steal. The coop, however, is junk. For Leghorn sized breeds, you need about 4 sq ft of coop space and 10 sq ft of run space per bird. For larger, dual-purpose breeds, you need about 5 sq ft of coop and 12 to 15 sq ft of run space. And the bigger you make both, the better.
 

L0laCh1ck3n

In the Brooder
Jun 10, 2016
11
0
12
I might just have to thin the flock. Thanks though. I knowbthe coop isnt ideal, but I have chicken fever and this deal is just to good to pass up. LOL.
 

Florida

In the Brooder
6 Years
Sep 27, 2013
35
1
23
Have had 2 roosters and 5 hens in mine often. They have other choices but they really love that little coop.
 

L0laCh1ck3n

In the Brooder
Jun 10, 2016
11
0
12
See the way I would set it up would be from sun up to sun down they would free range in the fenced in yard since I am home. When not at home theyd have the two runs plus coop. Then at night theyd be in coop. Girls are all under six months and no roos.
 

junebuggena

Crowing
Apr 17, 2015
23,102
8,201
491
Long Beach, WA
See the way I would set it up would be from sun up to sun down they would free range in the fenced in yard since I am home. When not at home theyd have the two runs plus coop. Then at night theyd be in coop. Girls are all under six months and no roos.
Still way too small for more than 3 large breed hens to sleep in. You have to remember that even in a mild climate, there will be days or even weeks when they would be forced to take shelter in the coop. That coop is maybe 2x2 or 3x3 at best. The average hen takes up about 1 sq ft just standing still. Then you have to account for maneuvering and flapping space. Wing spans average 3 to 4 feet wide. Remember, the coop is only the enclosed, shelter part; and you don't count the nest boxes in the sq footage. The open air part is a run.
Either get the birds, and build them an appropriately sized coop and run, or rehome all but a few. Overcrowding stress is serious. And 'just at night' is still anywhere from 8 to 16 hours, depending on the time of year, and location on the globe. Overcrowding stress induced behaviors are incredibly difficult to eliminate, once they begin. It can even lead to birds cannibalizing each other.
 

EasterEggDrew

Chirping
Aug 9, 2016
153
29
91
the bigger you make both, the better.
Is this always true? Shopping for combo coop/runs here, as well, and I've been rejecting those with coops much larger than 4 sq.ft. per bird. My reasoning is that I'm worried about them staying warm when we have our occasional but not uncommon stretches of weather with 15F days and 0F nights. I've read so much about not heating a coop, but a big cavernous coop with only a few birds in it might not be better, in cold weather.
 

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