Hens on strike after predator attack

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by southernsibe, Dec 17, 2012.

  1. southernsibe

    southernsibe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 15, 2007
    Lanexa, Virginia
    I need some ideas. Background story, I had a rather severe predator attack, it was a reign of terror for them until I got the culprit(s). Over all it lasted about 2 weeks and I lost about 2/3 of my flock.

    How long is the typical egg strike if it happens?
    Is there anything that can be done to "inspire" them to start laying? NO eggs, No one is laying.
    What are other people's experiences with this?
    Any thing at this point is helpful.
    Thanks in advance to everyone
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    The combination of 'predator stress' and shortened day length has shut your hens down. They may very well not start laying until spring. Increased day length through the use of artificial lighting will probably help to bring them back into production.
     
  3. southernsibe

    southernsibe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sourland,
    Do you think if I were to add a few hens that are currently laying it would encourage them to begin again?
     
  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Actually, the addition of more hens might be an additional stressor as they reshuffle the pecking order. That being said, if you want more hens, now might indeed be a good time to add them. Their egg production will stop initially, but in the next week or so day length (prime controller of egg production) will be increasing and should spur your hens to start laying. 12 - 14 daylight hours seem to be needed for maximum egg production.
     

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