Hey You EE Experts!

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by lavandula girl, Mar 5, 2009.

  1. lavandula girl

    lavandula girl Chillin' With My Peeps

    I got an EE pullet recently, who has not yet laid any eggs. The guy I got her from says she's an Amerucauna, but I know that's bull. I didn't argue, though, as I was just looking for some interesting colored eggs, not a show hen. Anyway... she has slate green legs, and cheek muffs and a beard, but she is certainly mutt colored, and has a medium tall single comb, instead of a pea comb. So... what are the chances I'll get green eggs out of her? She's the last of the girls to lay, and the real reason I want an answer is that I don't want to short change her of any kudos if she is, in fact, laying... all my other girls lay brown eggs. If she gives up a brown egg, will it have a tint of some other color, do you think?
     
  2. MoodyChicken

    MoodyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The green egg train is dominant, so she'll lay some degree of green.
     
  3. lavandula girl

    lavandula girl Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thanks for the quick info, MC... that rocks! [​IMG] Now... to go tell her to stop sandbagging and get to work.
     
  4. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    There are lots of EEs that lay brown eggs. I wouldn't hold out hope for a green egg until she lays one. You just never know what you're going to get from an EE. The only way to know what color egg she will lay is to know with certainly what color egg her father is from and what color egg her mother laid.

    The single comb is a sign that she has brown egg in her history somewhere and even better odds that her eggs may be brown. The blue egg gene seems to travel with the pea comb gene.

    If her eggs are brown, there is no chance of the color changing or showing evidence of any blue egg gene history. The shade of brown may vary, but it will always be brown.
     
  5. lavandula girl

    lavandula girl Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yeah - I'm 95.5% sure that she hasn't laid yet, so I'm holding out hope. Currently she's so busy being Freeloader McBossyboots that she can't be bothered to lay. She is interested in the boxes though, so it shouldn't be too much longer. I even caught her singing the egg song today, although when she realized I'd noticed, she quickly went and bit the Red Star, just for show. [​IMG]
     
  6. Tailfeathers

    Tailfeathers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:This is spot on and you can take that to the bank. I would just add one comment. If she has blue egg and brown egg genetics in her, you could come up with a sort of pastel purplish egg. You will know it's from her because it will have sort of a powdery look to it. This is caused by the brown being overlayed onto the blue.

    I was also gonna address the "getting close to laying" comments but in the interest of saving time, check this out:

    http://www.albc-usa.org/documents/ALBCchicken_assessment-2.pdf

    It's really good and should be helpful.

    God Bless,
     
  7. MoodyChicken

    MoodyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lavandula... California gold country as in Auburn/Grass Valley/Placer County area? I think we're neighbors... well, county neighbors
     
  8. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Single comb does not indicate brown egg. Leghorns, for example lay white eggs and have single combs, as do many other breeds. The lack of a pea comb, however is a strong indication that it is unlikely that the bird carries the blue egg gene.

    Brown overlaid by blue gives a green egg.

    Blue egg is dominant, but the trait first has to be inherited, and since the bird inherited a single comb it is very unlikely, although still possible, that the bird inherited the blue egg gene. Pea comb and blue egg genes are closely linked.
     
  9. lavandula girl

    lavandula girl Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:MC - as in El Dorado County, along the Highway 49 corridor. I live about 10 minutes from Marshall Gold Discovery State Park. So probably close to each other for sure. Have you ever gone to the poultry auction near Denio's? I hear mixed things, and would like first hand info, for sure.

    Thanks for the input, everyone. It'll be interesting to see what she eventually produces. Like I said, right now she's mostly interested in getting first to the food and chasing the other girls. She's definitely a pullet, but I think she isn't convinced. I have a tomboy chicken. [​IMG]
     
  10. sara

    sara Title Needed Here

    Quote:Off topic, but isn't green a blue egg with a brown coating?
     

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