TherryChicken

Crowing
7 Years
Sep 16, 2012
5,380
194
253
del valle, tx
I just wanted to update yall on my gelding. He looks rough and hurts but he is healing nicely. Today I found out why he is getting injured. He has been fighting off a stallion who keeps trying to get to my mare. Worst thing is he may have succeeded.
 

SilkieNation

Songster
12 Years
Oct 26, 2007
417
83
186
Rhode Island
I just wanted to update yall on my gelding. He looks rough and hurts but he is healing nicely. Today I found out why he is getting injured. He has been fighting off a stallion who keeps trying to get to my mare. Worst thing is he may have succeeded.
Geez. Some serious fighting. I hope you don't have a foal on the way and glad you solved the mystery.
 

TherryChicken

Crowing
7 Years
Sep 16, 2012
5,380
194
253
del valle, tx
Geez. Some serious fighting. I hope you don't have a foal on the way and glad you solved the mystery.
Thank you and me too because our mare has perminant back injuries. She has swayed back and has a twisted bone. The bone at the deepest dip is the twisted one. I'm afraid it would kill her to get pregnant. She has to stay skinny due to her back. If she gains anymore weight then she goes into pain ants the weight pulls on her back. N yes he loves his mares and are VERY protective of them and will do what it takes to keep them safe
 

Bunnylady

POOF Goes the Pooka
Nov 27, 2009
18,745
9,703
641
Wilmington, NC
@TherryChicken I'm glad your gelding is healing up well. I treated injuries like that on a horse that got tangled up in an inactive hotwire once; you will need to watch out for "proud flesh," but as nasty as they look, wounds like that can heal with barely a scar.

If you think the mare may be pregnant, there is a shot that a vet can give to abort the foal. It can be hard on her, but not as hard as carrying a foal to term and delivering it. It would bring her into heat again, so there would be the same risk if the stallion is still around. Even if the mare hasn't "settled," she will be coming into season about once per month, and you will be back in the same situation. I hope for your sake that the stallion is no longer in the picture.
 

TherryChicken

Crowing
7 Years
Sep 16, 2012
5,380
194
253
del valle, tx
@TherryChicken
  I'm glad your gelding is healing up well. I treated injuries like that on a horse that got tangled up in an inactive hotwire once; you will need to watch out for "proud flesh," but as nasty as they look, wounds like that can heal with barely a scar.

If you think the mare may be pregnant, there is a shot that a vet can give to abort the foal. It can be hard on her, but not as hard as carrying a foal to term and delivering it. It would bring her into heat again, so there would be the same risk if the stallion is still around. Even if the mare hasn't "settled," she will be coming into season about once per month, and you will be back in the same situation. I hope for your sake that the stallion is no longer in the picture.
Sadly the stallion is still around. We are lucky that the land owners where my horses are is letting us build a fence several feet away so the stallion can not get to her. Once my mom comes back into town we will call and talk to the vets on what our options are. I hope she isn't pregnant. I'd love a foal from her, but she is in NO shape to carry or birth. I'm still un sure on how to know when and if he gets proud flesh. Not sure on what it looks like or what to look for. N thank you so am i. I love our horses!!
 

Bunnylady

POOF Goes the Pooka
Nov 27, 2009
18,745
9,703
641
Wilmington, NC
Proud flesh is a situation where the tissue that is meant to fill in and heal the wound gets carried away, and grows above (stands "proud" of) the level of the skin. If caught early, an ointment containing steroids can keep it in check and let the wound heal properly; if it gets out of hand, surgery may be required to get the level back to one that the skin can close over.

Who owns the stallion? IMO, they should be paying for the fence; and the vet bills for your gelding and mare, too. Intact male animals are a 24/7 headache; any person that wants to own one needs to be responsible enough to make sure their headache doesn't create headaches for other people. I admit, "studly" geldings can be almost as bad (and can do serious damage, too - I knew someone who had to put a pony down after he had an altercation with another gelding; most likely over a mare), but they aren't usually as obsessive about it.

Excuse me a moment while I preach.
Not all stallions are man-eating monsters; I haven't known a lot of them, but a couple that I did know were quite well-behaved. The thing is, they are hormone-driven, and however well-trained and docile they may be to handle, breeding will always be on their agenda. It takes pretty substantial fencing to confine a stallion, and a fair amount of vigilance to keep everybody safe around one. Too many stallion owners aren't that careful, which is why every mare that comes from a place that has a stallion on the property should be pregnancy tested (I have known people that unknowingly bought mares that were pregnant, and weren't particularly thrilled when they found out). This is also why smart mare owners don't board their girls at a barn that also houses a stallion on the premises - why create an opportunity for an "accident" to happen; best just to avoid the situation entirely.

Incidentally, when aborting an unwanted pregnancy, Lutalyse works best early in the pregnancy, and the earlier the better. There are also relatively inexpensive tests that you can do to find out if your mare is pregnant, which can help you to know what further steps may need to be taken.
 

TherryChicken

Crowing
7 Years
Sep 16, 2012
5,380
194
253
del valle, tx
Proud flesh is a situation where the tissue that is meant to fill in and heal the wound gets carried away, and grows above (stands "proud" of) the level of the skin. If caught early, an ointment containing steroids can keep it in check and let the wound heal properly; if it gets out of hand, surgery may be required to get the level back to one that the skin can close over. 

Who owns the stallion? IMO, they should be paying for the fence; and the vet bills for your gelding and mare, too. Intact male animals are a 24/7 headache; any person that wants to own one needs to be responsible enough to make sure their headache doesn't create headaches for other people. I admit, "studly" geldings can be almost as bad (and can do serious damage, too - I knew someone who had to put a pony down after he had an altercation with another gelding; most likely over a mare), but they aren't usually as obsessive about it.

Excuse me a moment while I preach.:rolleyes:  Not all stallions are man-eating monsters; I haven't known a lot of them, but a couple that I did know were quite well-behaved. The thing is, they are hormone-driven, and however well-trained and docile they may be to handle, breeding will always be on their agenda. It takes pretty substantial fencing to confine a stallion, and a fair amount of vigilance to keep everybody safe around one. Too many stallion owners aren't that careful,  which is why every mare that comes from a place that has a stallion on the property should be pregnancy tested (I have known people that unknowingly bought mares that were pregnant, and weren't particularly thrilled when they found out). This is also why smart mare owners don't board their girls at a barn that also houses a stallion on the premises - why create an opportunity for an "accident" to happen; best just to avoid the situation entirely.

Incidentally, when aborting an unwanted pregnancy, Lutalyse works best early in the pregnancy, and the earlier the better. There are also relatively inexpensive tests that you can do to find out if your mare is pregnant, which can help you to know what further steps may need to be taken.
I pmed you.. also I doubt they will pay for anything. I don't even think they speak english. After years of having my horses there never have I seen the stallion or had a problem. Our horses are on a friend's property not a boarded facility etc. Like I said we had to cut wire to free their stallion as he had been there a while as he didn't even move when my mare got close. But when we cut it n I was going to do fast spraying of cuts our are got close he knew he was free n bit my friend n acted a stallion again.

You can see part of our mares condition pretty bad swayed back. Other is the twisted bone and anymore weight past now.. she goes into pain.
 

BridebelieverDD

In the Brooder
Dec 30, 2015
51
7
45
Hey another horse lover! I just found this thread and couldn't stop reading! I don't have a horse but I love hearing all of your adventures and looking at all of the pictures.
 

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