How about outdoor sensor lights

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Churkenduse, Mar 28, 2011.

  1. Churkenduse

    Churkenduse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Due to some recent predator problems I decided to install some sensor lights on the coop. Even if It doesn’t chase the animals away it will wake me up and I will make noise and chase them.
    The last predator ran like the devil when I shown a light on him so I thought this might work.
    Has anyone tried this? does it help?
     
  2. jojo54

    jojo54 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 24, 2009
    BC Canada
    I have lights on my coop but you need to watch the placement. Mine were going on when the girls were going to bed at night and a few would linger around in the light for a few more scratch and pecks so it was taking them forever to go to bed so we could shut the door. We changed the angle a bit and things are much better.
     
  3. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Most people find that if they do any good it is only against occasional passing-thru "casual" predators. An individual that encounters the light turning on repeatedly (b/c it frequently visits the area) or is seriously hungry, is not necessarily going to be very impressed.

    I mean, you can do it if you want, but I would not rely on it to be actually doing anything important, you know? You need to have completely-sufficient-to-your-tastes OTHER predator defenses.

    JMHO, good luck, have fun,

    Pat, who finds motion-sensor lights much more apt to go off on account of winds blowing tree branches or a stray cat wandering past or the thing getting bumped out of alignment and registering the livestock's own movement, than to actually do much good in alerting you to predators; but of course YMMV
     
  4. Churkenduse

    Churkenduse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't have any other live stock so it will not go off when other animals go by. But I sleep near the coop and if the light goes off even if the animal does not get spooked, by the time he can manage to get into the coop which is doubtful, it will wake me and I will chase it.
    I just need it as a precaution. The only time I got an animal inside it was because the door was not shut in time, my fault.
     
  5. Noymira

    Noymira Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I found a solar motion light I was thinking about getting for our coop (no chickens yet) for the same reason. I also thought it might be useful for us going out to check on the chickens after dark in winter months, in addition to bringing a flashlight.
     
  6. krcote

    krcote Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I love my motion lights, they have scared off many would-be-predators at my house.
     
  7. Churkenduse

    Churkenduse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Noymira, that is a good point. didn't think of that, thanks

    Krcote, that is what my thought was thanks for the encouragement.

    We all try to do what we can to keep our pets safe, so if there is a chance I that it will work I think it is worth it, and like Noymira says it will help with my walking in the dark in the summer.
     
  8. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My dad tried sensor lights (and just about everything else) to protect his sweet corn from raccoons. Worked for about two nights, and then never again.
     
  9. Churkenduse

    Churkenduse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am using it to keep them out of a coop not corn :eek:)
     
  10. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Yes but the point is that chickens are at least as attractive to raccoons as sweet corn is [​IMG]

    Pat
     

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