1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

How Are you managing?????

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Clay In Iowa, Oct 13, 2011.

  1. Clay In Iowa

    Clay In Iowa Chillin' With My Peeps

    663
    6
    141
    Oct 9, 2008
    Near Wilton Iowa
    3 years ago when I started raising chickens a 40 pound bag of feed was $6.99 .... yesterday at the same store it was $11.99 ON SALE !!!!!!

    If I didn't know the eggs are better, the chickens treated better and the experience an overall good one... I'd be done ..

    My birds are just shy of free range. They have about 15,000 square feet to roam in. They have a massive mulberry tree, 6 wild plumbs and more to eat from when the fruit is rip. I feed them cucumber, zucchini, water melon, tomatoes, apples, and cantaloupe from the garden... but it's not really enough. at $11.99 a bag for feed my eggs would still cost $6.00 (or more) a dozen.

    What are you doing to bring the costs down?
     
  2. train2110

    train2110 Chillin' With My Peeps

    136
    0
    99
    Jul 6, 2010
    eastern New York
    We sell just enough eggs to help cover the cost of feed and such.
     
  3. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    Wow... That's pretty pricey! I don't know how, but 40 lbs of feed is still lasting me (11 hens) - and it's been 2 months!
     
  4. ThePigeonKid

    ThePigeonKid Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,514
    28
    186
    May 24, 2010
    Ohio - Chickens 3yrs
    I pay $11.99 for 50 lbs of chicken food & $16.00 for 50 lbs of duck food.
     
  5. ECBW

    ECBW Chillin' With My Peeps

    812
    34
    133
    Apr 12, 2011
    NJ
    I guess it depends on the efficiency of your flock.

    My area is $15 for 50lb bag. This lasts me about 1 month. At this time, I am getting about 3 dozens per week as return. I think the birds are more than paying for their own keep.

    Efficiency is why farmer cull their birds after 1 year.
     
  6. Clay In Iowa

    Clay In Iowa Chillin' With My Peeps

    663
    6
    141
    Oct 9, 2008
    Near Wilton Iowa
    Quote:In that case... my birds SUCK... lol

    I'm burning through far more than that and at their peak production I get a dozen a day from 31 hens...

    which is why nearly all of them are headed to freezer camp and I'm looking into better egg laying replacements.
     
  7. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

  8. darin367

    darin367 Chillin' With My Peeps

    315
    12
    111
    Dec 1, 2010
    Shelton, Wa.
    ONLY 12 EGGS A DAY FROM 31 HENS...... time for a check,,,is this normal for your breed... if not you need to check your set up, food etc..... i have 13 hens, 3 rir, 3 barred rcks, 2 australorps, the rest mixed breeds of those and i get 10-12 eggs a day..... if i had to feed 31 hens for 12 eggs everyday some of the non layers would be my dinner.....
     
  9. Clay In Iowa

    Clay In Iowa Chillin' With My Peeps

    663
    6
    141
    Oct 9, 2008
    Near Wilton Iowa
    Quote:It's on the low side of normal for them.. On a really good day I'll get 18... but when you average it it works out to be about 12 a day during peak laying.. then there's the 1 or 2 eggs a day when they all decide to molt at once.... Like now...

    I do have some low egg producing Buckeys in the mix. Normal is 2-3 eggs a week but they are are the table.

    I'm basically looking at starting over with better egg layers.. many of the strains I got were bred more for show and not for eggs. This time around econimcs dictates I get egg layers... that will actually forage.

    C.
     
  10. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    I've found that the thriftiest and most productive flocks are comprised of simple, old standby breeds: Black Aussies, White Rocks, New Hamps, RIR, White Leghorns. Thrifty on feed, good at foraging, reproduce themselves well without being excessively broody, hardy and consistent egg laying over many years.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by