How can you have two or more roosters in a flock?

Bullitt

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8 Years
Jan 16, 2012
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Texas
How can you have two or more roosters in the same flock?



Is more space required per chicken than with just one rooster? How many hens per rooster are needed? What else is needed?
 
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Judy

Crowing
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Feb 5, 2009
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People do it all the time. It doesn't change the space requirements -- although things will be more peaceful if they have a back ard or field to range. One will be dominant over the other, and will do most of the mating and crowing. The non dominant one will try to se=neak in some mating when the dominant one isn't looking.

Of course, first they have to decide who is dominant. This may not involve anything more than a little chest bumping. or it may involve some serious fights. I've kept only dual purpose birds and have never seen a serious fight -- but chickens are individuals.
 

Bullitt

Crowing
8 Years
Jan 16, 2012
2,380
451
251
Texas
People do it all the time. It doesn't change the space requirements -- although things will be more peaceful if they have a back ard or field to range. One will be dominant over the other, and will do most of the mating and crowing. The non dominant one will try to se=neak in some mating when the dominant one isn't looking.

Of course, first they have to decide who is dominant. This may not involve anything more than a little chest bumping. or it may involve some serious fights. I've kept only dual purpose birds and have never seen a serious fight -- but chickens are individuals.


How many hens per rooster is a good ratio when there are two or more roosters?
 
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bobbi-j

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Mar 15, 2010
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The most commonly recommended ratio is 8-10 hens per rooster. Less than that, and there is a possibility that your hens could be overmated, causing them to have bald backs and be stressed. It may not happen, but it's possible. Some roosters can live peacefully in the same flock, some not so much. I have had both situations here.
 

chazman

In the Brooder
6 Years
Aug 10, 2013
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Help we have a chicken that is acting weird don't know what's wrong or what to do. She just lays around not even interested in eating. Anyone know what to do for her?
 

TheReadyBoys

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CherishHolland

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Apr 16, 2013
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Canyon Texas
I have 4 roosters in my laying flock of 50 hens, they all get along and they have an alpha roo no fighting goes on and they share the run and coop without any issues,well other than crowing. The alpha prefers to be the 1st one to crow and if the other boys crow before him he gives them the eye. It also seems like each rooster is assigned a job,alpha is in charge of mating and making sure the girls eat,the next roo is in charge of air watch,the other on ground patrol and the last guy is in charge of watching the nesting area while the gals are laying. I guess space space space is the key factor and my hen to roo ratio seems to work.
 

WalkingOnSunshine

Crowing
11 Years
Apr 8, 2008
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Ohio
I agree, the keys to keeping multiple boys are numbers of hens and space. We always have roosters around, but rarely get near that 1:10 ratio. Usually we're closer to 1:15 or more. We also have a lot of space.

Usually the roosters take very little notice of each other, even roosting together on the top roost. It's almost like an old-fashioned kingdom, with the alpha rooster being the king over all his subordinates, each of whom also has his own little fiefdom. The alpha keeps his favorite hens, and also mates with whatever hens he chooses. The remaining hens are sort of divvied up among the subordinate roosters, each of whom keeps his little flock together most of the time. If the alpha is occupied elsewhere, though, the subordinates might sneak over and mate the alpha's hens when he's not looking. It's kind of funny.

Things are usually very quiet except in the spring, which is when that space comes into play. In the spring, the subordinates try to advance their respective positions, They'll try to move up in the rooster pecking order (which is separate from the hen pecking order). There is always sparring and they'll fluff up their hackles and fly at each other, claws and spurs out. I'm sure they'd do real damage to each other without a lot of space. As it is, there is always room for the loser to run away. The winner will chase the loser around and around the pasture until the winner is sure the loser understands who's the boss. We see a lot of feathers flying, but my motto is "no blood, no foul." This only lasts for a few days each spring, until the pecking order is fully established again.

Sometimes a rooster will move up to alpha, sort of overnight. It usually happens when a big, strapping young cockerel challenges an older rooster who's been the alpha for several years. In those cases. it's almost as if the alpha doesn't fight it--he knows his run is over. He'll drop down in the pecking order, and his hens will drop in the pecking order, too. The hens belonging to the new king will move up in the pecking order. Reminds me of "The king is defeated--long live the king!"
 

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