How Do I Catch My Roo?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Chickensfan, Jul 22, 2016.

  1. Chickensfan

    Chickensfan Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,226
    119
    156
    Jun 26, 2016
    California!
    hello.
    i was wondering of some of the ways to catch my rooster, Pine. i have tried getting him to come over with food, and herding him with my arms outstretched. neither worked. any ideas would be appreciated,
    ~Marie
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

    63,889
    9,653
    766
    May 3, 2009
    New Jersey
    Catching him while he is roosting at night.
     
  3. Chickensfan

    Chickensfan Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,226
    119
    156
    Jun 26, 2016
    California!
    hmm. i don't just want to hold him for enjoyment. i need to hold him because he is aggressive, and i have heard holding them a lot helps.
    thanks!
    ~Marie
     
  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

    63,889
    9,653
    766
    May 3, 2009
    New Jersey
    When he comes at you, scoop him up in a short handled fishing net and carry him around in that. It's all about subordinating him and making him uncomfortable so that he does not want to mess with you. In my experience simply 'holding' a rooster has never helped stop human aggressive behavior.
     
  5. Chickensfan

    Chickensfan Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,226
    119
    156
    Jun 26, 2016
    California!
    he is not aggressive towards me. he is aggressive to the other chickens.
     
  6. dekel18042

    dekel18042 Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,183
    258
    211
    Jul 18, 2013
    Pennsylvania
    How old is he? It could very well be a teenage hormonal thing which will continue until he matures and settles down. How many girls do you have? I'm not sure your intervening will change his attitude to the girls. If he is a rough you may want to separate him for a while and then see if he improves when you put him back in.
     
  7. Chickensfan

    Chickensfan Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,226
    119
    156
    Jun 26, 2016
    California!
    he doesn't pick on the girls. he pecks on one other roo, Palmer. i found Palmer leaning against the fence looking lethargic after Pine chased him everywhere. recently he chased him into hiding. the 3 poland ladies i recently integrated took a liking to Palmer, and showed him their best hiding place. he has been hiding ever since, only coming out for food and water. all of them are 3 months. Pine literally CHARGES at Palmer. recently i saw Pine look at me with such hatred, i wanted to cry.
     
  8. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

    8,663
    3,328
    441
    Mar 15, 2010
    On the MN prairie.
    Sounds to me like Pine is acting like a normal alpha rooster. You may need to think about separating them - maybe making two flocks that don't mingle, making a bachelor pad, or finding one of them a new home so Palmer can live in peace.
     
    3 people like this.
  9. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

    63,889
    9,653
    766
    May 3, 2009
    New Jersey
    Chickens don't 'hate'. That's pretty much a human trait. As bobbi- j says he's just being a normal dominant rooster. It's all about assuring that his DNA gets to carry on.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

    4,706
    1,332
    356
    Nov 12, 2009
    western South Dakota
    Often times one rooster is enough (or even too mcuh) for a backyard flock, unless you truly have a fair size flock, of say more than 25 two or more roosters are going to cause more problems than solutions.

    If you leave palmer in this situation, he will probably die. Roosters often times do not share hens well or at all. Sometimes a father/son relationship will work, and less often rooster chicks raised together will sometimes be alright together, sometimes for life, sometimes for a while, sometimes not at all.

    Adding a full grown rooster to a flock with an established rooster is asking for fights, sometimes fights till death. This is survival of the fittest, the strongest rooster's chicks are reproduced. Chicken society is very territorial, is often not pretty unless carefully managed.

    Mrs K
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2016
    3 people like this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by