How do I control the humidity?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by gamefowl-layers, Feb 21, 2016.

  1. gamefowl-layers

    gamefowl-layers Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 12, 2016
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    Hello my humidity reader is reading 64% and I just put the eggs in yesterday, but it feels as if I add/remove a little bit of water, it changes drastically. Is 64% too high for the first few days? Any help is appreciated thank you
     
  2. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Yes, especially if you are using a styro bator. If you are not in a high altitude you may want to think about using a low humidity incubation method. I use this method: http://letsraisechickens.weebly.com...anuals-understanding-and-controlling-humidity and have great success with it. As long as you are either monitoring the air cells or weighing you will know when or if you need to adjust your humidity. When possible (if it stays above 25%) I run completely dry for the first 17 days.
     
  3. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    I don't understand those large water wells in styro incubators. Maybe if you lived in arid Arizona and heated at night with wood you'd need that much water to incubate, Humidity is derived from surface area of water in the incubator. Change the surface area and you change humidity in incubator. To achieve 30-35% RH in incubator my region I only need a double shot glass of water set to side of auto turner. To get humidity up to 70% for hatching I need less than two short coffee cups sitting in incubator. The depth of water doesn't matter it's surface area. Once the top is off the combination of humid air leaving incubator and air temp in incubator lowering will change RH readings drastically. Relative Humidity is moisture content relative to temperature. Changing both with removal of lid will take time to stabilize again. Air changes quickly, the eggs themselves wont.
     
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  4. gamefowl-layers

    gamefowl-layers Out Of The Brooder

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    My incubator humidity keeps changing from 30-50%. Will it affect the eggs if it's changing a lot?
     
  5. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Is it changing naturally from the changes in the environment or because of changes inside the incubator? Are you running with water or dry? What does your incubator run with no water?

    Humidity has it's biggest effect over the incubation period. If it is staying high more often than not and the eggs aren't loosing the moisture they should you have a higher risk of problems at hatch. If it's staying down toward the 30-40 the majority with shorter periods of spiking and the eggs are loosing the appropriet moisture, then there's less chance of problems. If mine stays above 25% dry, I run dry and just keep an eye on my air cells to make sure they don't get too big too fast. If it is dry and the bator can't maintain enough humidity I add a wet sponge and it usually holds it right around 30%. I can always tell when my sponge is drying out because I don't have temperature control (LG9200) and my temp starts increasing, so I re wet it, usually about once a day.
     
  6. gamefowl-layers

    gamefowl-layers Out Of The Brooder

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    Littlerock California

    I'm running it with a little water. Dry incubating reads 12%. It's in my empty closet so I doubt it's the room changing drastically.
     
  7. kuchchicks

    kuchchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What is your water held in? Are you using the water channels in the bottom of the bator or a sponge/cup, etc? If you are having a hard time getting you humidity where you want it try using sponges. They are easy to add/remove. And I totally agree with the above... watching your air cells is key. Where you run your humidity at is going to depend in large on your location. It is more flexible than where you run your temp and may change through out the year. Shoot for a "goal" level. Then raise or lower your humidity based on where your air cells are when you candle.

    Also make sure that you gauge is correct. There are directions on this site that will tell you how to calibrate.
     
  8. gamefowl-layers

    gamefowl-layers Out Of The Brooder

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    Littlerock California

    The water is in the water channels alone. Is this bad?
     
  9. kuchchicks

    kuchchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No not at all. How many channels do you have? I have to put water in the smallest channel to keep my levels where I need it. If I use the larger ones my humidity jumps way up. You will need to play with it to find your sweet spot.
     
  10. gamefowl-layers

    gamefowl-layers Out Of The Brooder

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    Littlerock California

    Is that why the channels are shaped differently? I never figured why they weren't just a whole channel.
     

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