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How do I keep water thawed?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by blueberrysilky, Jan 19, 2016.

  1. blueberrysilky

    blueberrysilky Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 28, 2015
    Archdale, NC
    I have tried the cookie can idea but this trips the GFCI outlet. I think I may have too much voltage being pulled.(80 watts + 40 watts + 40 watts = 160 total pulled watts)(I guess I have a short to ground point.) Does anyone have a alternative way to keep water thawed, preferably not using electricity, I know that's not practical but can anyone tell an easier way, and more energy efficient way.
     
  2. Bridebeliever

    Bridebeliever Chillin' With My Peeps

    Some people wrap their waters with insulation (the kind with silver wrap) but I'm pretty sure they still use a heater in there too. It may work, depending on how cold it gets where you are and how long it stays that cold.
     
  3. Chicken Heads

    Chicken Heads Out Of The Brooder

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    Is your coop sealed or insulated? Mine isn't sealed or insulated but I did plug up most of the holes and added 2-250watts red heating lamps , current outside temps is about 20 degrees or colder and inside stays approx 55-60F at all times.. Still a tad bit cold for the types of birds I have but solved my water freezing issue. I keep water in a clear half bucket with sealed lid with small hole and plug for easy drain and fill on lid..( bought from feed store) it also helps keeping water from evaporating. B4 I did that water will usually freeze in few hrs. As far as saving electricity energy there isn't really a way around that... If u can't keep temp in coop above freezing you'll have to do more frequent ice chipping water changes which I did not like doing at all[​IMG] Wish u the best of luck.
     
  4. blueberrysilky

    blueberrysilky Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My coop isn't insulated, I have a small 40 watt bulb inside the coop that probably doesn't help much at all. What do you mean by insulation, is there a way to do that? If so how can I insulate?
     
  5. ccat1

    ccat1 Out Of The Brooder

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    I use my greenhouse (6x8 Harbor Freight GH) in the winter for my chickens. My waterer is a 2 gallon galvanized unit......the double wall anti siphon one. I have it sitting on top of a terracotta flowerpot base. This is all sitting on top of a single cinder block with 60w bulb inside of the cinder block. I ran the cord and extension cord inside of 2" pvc so no cord is visible to the chickens.
    I couldn't find a 40w bulb so I have used the 60w all season. We have had some 14 degree nights that got down around 25 in the GH and the water stays drinkable and not edible....frozen!
    I know there are probably better ways, but for me, this has worked really well and I don't have to worry about frozen water.
    hope this helps
     
  6. Chicken Heads

    Chicken Heads Out Of The Brooder

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    your coop have to be enclosed with walls on all sides with minimal venting, insulate the inner walls with materials like how u do when building a house... I then top it off with foil, the idea is to keep heat in if your gonna be using heat lamps but be cautious!! Heating lamps burn really hot and can cause fire so lamp must be secured. If u lose way more heat then u can produce its useless... I have a thermometer inside of coop so it gives me an idea of inside temps. Either way u must bring coop temps up above 32 degrees or heat the water directly with bulb method as mentioned or approved store bought heated water jugs. Also use heavy gauge extension cords.. Have fun[​IMG]
     
  7. GodofPecking

    GodofPecking Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 16, 2015
    Actually, my currently in use brooder would be great in this application. It's an old fridge, on it's side ( but on it's back is ok too, but keep hosing out in mind ) I have chick in there for a few weeks so far, from a few days old. I've raised a few sets in there.

    The heating can be really easily regulated with a desk lamp. You can choose those LED lights for 3 watts, 5 watts, those CFL's for 9 to 13 watts, regular old bulbs for 20 to 100 watts. Never use 100 watts, they are too hot.

    The heat that either gets into the fridge or is made in the fridge stays there. It would be extremely difficult to get a waterbowl to freeze in weather that is only subzero some of the time. With a very small bulb it would keep the water liquid.

    BIG advantage of this for small chickens is the light attracts lots of flying insects at night. They fly into my fridge ......to their doom. The chicks love catching and gobbling them up. Plus the light in the garden looks like a fairy house.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. RonP

    RonP Chillin' With My Peeps

    There are many, many articles and information written by those much more knowledgeable than myself, that reference the importance of proper ventilation to insure good respiratory and general health.

    How does your refrigerator method address those issues and major concerns?
     
  9. RonP

    RonP Chillin' With My Peeps

    I once used an exposed bulb similar to yours.

    As an FYI, some water dripped on the exposed bulb while replacing the container, the hot bulb shattered and I had to deal with tiny splinters of glass.

    The terracotta flowerpot base is a great idea.
     
  10. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Northwest Arkansas
    My method is to water outside using a black rubber bowl from Tractor Supply set where the sun can hit it. As long as the sun is shining passive solar heat will keep the water thawed in some pretty low temperatures. In know, the sun doesn’t always shine so when it is frozen I bash the ice out and refill it. Since it is rubber the bowl does not break. I’m retired so I’m normally around to refill it if I need to but that is not as often as many people would expect. I’d think in North Carolina your weather would not be ridiculously different from mine. Several sunny days but some not. Some mornings it would be frozen, some not.

    [​IMG]

    I keep a large rock in it to keep them from knocking it off when it starts to get empty.
     

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