How do I know if she’s is serious about being broody

ariri30

Free Ranging
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May 18, 2015
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pixie my silver Sebright has been clucking and fluffing for a few days now. She gets in her nest for a couple of hours gets out and then she act like that all day and then go to sleep with the rest of the chickens. I want her to hatch her eggs. But how serious is she? Does it take a few days for them to get serious and stay in the nest? Oh and she’s six months old today
 

ChocolateMouse

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Jul 29, 2013
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She's not serious and is probably too young to get serious. Give her fake eggs. If she doesn't stay on those eggs nearly 24/7 for three days (only getting up for maybe an hour midday), she's just play acting. It doesn't sound like she's serious right now if she's sleeping with the other chickens on the roost not on the eggs.
 

ariri30

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May 18, 2015
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She's not serious and is probably too young to get serious. Give her fake eggs. If she doesn't stay on those eggs nearly 24/7 for three days (only getting up for maybe an hour midday), she's just play acting. It doesn't sound like she's serious right now if she's sleeping with the other chickens on the roost not on the eggs.
Ok thanks!
 

Morrigan

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Apr 9, 2014
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Keep an eye on her. Sometimes hens exhibiting this behavior do eventually go broody for real. As the above poster noted, you will know she is serious when she stops roosting and spends all her time on the nest except for one or two breaks.

I've had hens acting this way go broody a week or so later, and I had others who remain "fakers." I've also had hens give almost no hint, I just find them clamped onto the nest one day.
 

ariri30

Free Ranging
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May 18, 2015
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Keep an eye on her. Sometimes hens exhibiting this behavior do eventually go broody for real. As the above poster noted, you will know she is serious when she stops roosting and spends all her time on the nest except for one or two breaks.

I've had hens acting this way go broody a week or so later, and I had others who remain "fakers." I've also had hens give almost no hint, I just find them clamped onto the nest one day.
Thanks so much for the advice. I just had two that just stayed in the nest one day. They were about the same age as this one. One is a Dutch and the other an Araucana. They hatched 13 chicks all together
 

The Angry Hen

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She certainly is broody! It may seem a little too young for her to be brooding, but six months is when pullets will most likely begin laying... once they do, the rate of brooding can be very likely depending on the breed and the hen's personality.
If you're looking to break her broodiness- then there are multiple options for you. Meanwhile... if you're okay with her being broody, whether hatching or not, there are also many options.

I've had flighty hens brood until the chicks hatch- her getting stir crazy when they can take care of themselves. I've also had hens stay broody when their chicks hatch- them persisting that they still want to be a mother to more.

Smaller hens can be more prone to losing interest in a clutch of eggs due to their sometimes flighty or independent disposition. If Pixie really wants to be a mother, then, within the week stage, she'll continue on.

Here are signs of a true broody:

  • She'll rarely get up for water (which you should encourage her to walk around and pick her up to let her drink, or, bring the water to her).
  • Her breast feathers will be sparse, her back feathers rather rough and dull.
  • When another hen bothers her, or you dare to touch her eggs- real or fake- she'll peck or puff up.
  • Lastly, she'll hold out her wings and lower her head when leaving the nest box, making a constant "broody cluck"... this is normal for a not-so-ready broody, but, more often than not, a good broody hen will insist on going straight back to the nest box rather than a sand bath or scratch.

People question whether you should let hens brood this late in the summer... depending on the insulation of your coop, and whether there are any drafts during the night, it's your decision if letting her hatch is safe. She looks like she'd be a wonderful mother- but it varies on if you want her to continue and you believe she'd do good too.

I wish you the best of luck- God bless.

Another reason to have her hatch:
Watching a hen mother her hatchlings is very beautiful! :)
 

ariri30

Free Ranging
6 Years
May 18, 2015
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Fair lawn nj
She certainly is broody! It may seem a little too young for her to be brooding, but six months is when pullets will most likely begin laying... once they do, the rate of brooding can be very likely depending on the breed and the hen's personality.
If you're looking to break her broodiness- then there are multiple options for you. Meanwhile... if you're okay with her being broody, whether hatching or not, there are also many options.

I've had flighty hens brood until the chicks hatch- her getting stir crazy when they can take care of themselves. I've also had hens stay broody when their chicks hatch- them persisting that they still want to be a mother to more.

Smaller hens can be more prone to losing interest in a clutch of eggs due to their sometimes flighty or independent disposition. If Pixie really wants to be a mother, then, within the week stage, she'll continue on.

Here are signs of a true broody:

  • She'll rarely get up for water (which you should encourage her to walk around and pick her up to let her drink, or, bring the water to her).
  • Her breast feathers will be sparse, her back feathers rather rough and dull.
  • When another hen bothers her, or you dare to touch her eggs- real or fake- she'll peck or puff up.
  • Lastly, she'll hold out her wings and lower her head when leaving the nest box, making a constant "broody cluck"... this is normal for a not-so-ready broody, but, more often than not, a good broody hen will insist on going straight back to the nest box rather than a sand bath or scratch.

People question whether you should let hens brood this late in the summer... depending on the insulation of your coop, and whether there are any drafts during the night, it's your decision if letting her hatch is safe. She looks like she'd be a wonderful mother- but it varies on if you want her to continue and you believe she'd do good too.

I wish you the best of luck- God bless.

Another reason to have her hatch:
Watching a hen mother her hatchlings is very beautiful! :)
Oh thanks so much for that beautiful message you just sent me. Will see if she continues to be in the nest. My Dutch who had chicks and she raised over the summer it’s clucking a little bit now. Since she wants to be broody too. This little hens are a handful :eek:
 

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