How do you isolate?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by karen71, Oct 3, 2009.

  1. karen71

    karen71 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Bear, DE
    Just curious how everyone else here isolates new or ill birds? I have put some in dog crates in the garage, I had some chicks in the upstairs bathroom (Dh did not like them there) , I had a brooder set up down in the basement for some ( I did not like them there seemed too dungeon like) I am thinking ahead as there is an auction coming up and if I see something I like I want the best and easiest way to isolate- would a tractor of some sort away from the birds I already have be best for older chickens ? That way they would be outside and not stuck in a dog crate for 30 days . Just wondering what everyone else does .
    If you have pics of you isolation areas I would like to see them .
    Have a great afternoon everyone .
     
  2. WriterofWords

    WriterofWords Has Fainting Chickens

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    I use separate pens, nothing fancy just posts wire and a crate to sleep in.
     
  3. karen71

    karen71 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How far do you think they should be from each other ?
     
  4. juliawitt

    juliawitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My husband built a "segregation/brooder" area into my main henhouse. Basically, A box made of chicken wire; they can see each other but no pecking and no sharing of food, water Etc. Probably not the best for isolation because they could still share airborne illness, but I think it is pretty spiffy.[​IMG]
     
  5. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have 4x4x4 and a 7x13x6 dog runs that I have run extra wire up the first 2' or so and around the outside bottom (like an apron) that I use for isolation. The larger run has an old rabbit hutch and the smaller an Igloo dog house for shelter. Both runs are "rednecked out" and covered with a combo of old plywood, 2x4's and blue tarp. They look a little tacky, but are secure, comfortable and away from the main flock.
     
  6. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    For quarantine purposes, they should not breath the same air, nor share the same ground. If you mean isolation as in "chicken jail," they can be in anything and still be with the flock, but separated by wire or the likes.

    For quarantine I have a separate coop and run away from the main area. Then I have ajoining runs, so they see each other but not touch, before being put together.

    For isolation (such as a little bleeding wound that would be picked at), I have a large wire cage I put inside the main coop. This also works for behavior problems. I had one that kept picking feathers from others, and after 2 days in here, she stopped.
     
  7. idiganthro

    idiganthro Out Of The Brooder

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    We brought home 3 new pullets yesterday, from a dubious source. I was hesitant to take them at all, but hubby said we'd be saving their lives.
    So, we stayed up late and built a 4'x8' "hot zone" out of 2x4's and chicken wire. We turned a big rubbermaid tub upside down and cut an entrance in it for a place for them to go at night. The top is plywood to protect from rain. It's not fancy, but is sturdy and tidy in appearance.

    When I come home from work I take care of my current girls first, then the new ones in the "hot zone" and then shower. The new girls are on an antibiotic and are being given a high calorie, high protein food to try and get some weight on them.

    My healthy girls live in my backyard- we have an A Frame coop and they free range in the (fenced) yard during the day. Hopefully the new ones will be healthy in a month or 6 weeks so the "hot zone" can become the safety pen so they can get acquanted without having access to each other. Right now they can see each other, but the "hot zone" is about 15 feet from my fence.

    I can't wait till they're healthy and all together! Good luck- isolating is a pain in the backside, but so worth it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2009

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