How do you sound proof a coop?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by C&Rman, May 22, 2011.

  1. C&Rman

    C&Rman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We have peacocks that are calling every night. I am going to have to build them some sort of coop to keep the sound down because my neighbor hate me and my animals. How/what will I need?
     
  2. Coopa Cabana

    Coopa Cabana My Coop Runneth Over . . .

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    My Coop
    The walls of my coop are insulated with 2 layers of 2" syrofoam - total of 4". Not only great for insulation, but also keeps the noise down.
     
  3. harvster

    harvster Out Of The Brooder

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    The best sound proofing comes from density, so cinder blocks or cement work very well. However, given the ventilation requirements you may struggle to achieve the level of sound proofing you desire no matter what the materials you use.
     
  4. sassifrassi

    sassifrassi Out Of The Brooder

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    Haven't tried this yet...
    I am planning on using acoustic ceiling tile in my coop - both for a bit of insulation and sound proofing.
    I have also thought about using "acoustic blankets" (look on ebay) or moving blankets (the kind you see in elevators) for my parrots cage. The blankets would problably be easier to clean and would cover a greater area.
    Good luck!
     
  5. jamband

    jamband Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I agree with this, gonna be really tough to soundproof a well vented room. You very well may be able to reduce the sound though. Do you have a coop now or are you building a new one? The sound muffling will only come from dense walls.....this thread had a good night box for a rooster. I suppose you could build a coop in the same manner but I am not sure what would happen when you need to add the proper venting.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=5783420
     
  6. C&Rman

    C&Rman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I agree with this, gonna be really tough to soundproof a well vented room. You very well may be able to reduce the sound though. Do you have a coop now or are you building a new one? The sound muffling will only come from dense walls.....this thread had a good night box for a rooster. I suppose you could build a coop in the same manner but I am not sure what would happen when you need to add the proper venting.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=5783420

    I have a coop but it is not permant I just built it for shelter because I got my peacocks in a hurry. I can take it down so fast. I was thinking that I could build them a coop with 2"x6" boards and get R-19 insulation. I could drill a few holes at the top for ventalation. Would this plan work?
     
  7. StarrWulf

    StarrWulf New Egg

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    When building the coop, use the idea used by airports. You will not be able to completely eliminate sound, so the idea is to reduce it by channeling it into a different direction. Use the ideas given to block the sound on the sides given above, but also use methods *like a chimney* to ventilate upwards so whatever sound escapes goes up instead of the sides *double glass windows to reduce sound*. I have seen places on airports use angled walls so sound is channeled up skyward. In the 1800s the more well to do city houses would fill their walls with rocks to minimize the noise from the road *I suspect this is one of the reasons brick and stone houses were preferred over wooden walls*. Just remember if you add rocks to the walls, you also add alot of weight, too.
     
  8. Mavrik

    Mavrik Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sound proofing is very complex, sound frequencies need different materiel densities to adsorb them, you can't just add materiel and assume it will absorb the sound range of a peacock. Sound redirection helps, but it depends on the frequency on how many times the sound needs to bounce before depleting and how much gets though absorption materials before depleting. Then you have things like open vents and glass, which are difficult to dampen sound. You could spend thousands sound proofing a coop with a noticeable sound reduction. May be cheaper to have their voice boxes removed.

    With a brief search a peacock is at 120 decibels, which is also the threshold of pain for human hearing. Here are some sound examples; http://trace.wisc.edu/docs/2004-About-dB/
     
  9. CelticOaksFarm

    CelticOaksFarm Family owned, family run

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    you will need more ventilation than a few holes drilled around the top. You still have to provide good air flow to them. Peafowl deffiently arent for everyone. They run wild here and some dont mind them while others complain.
     
  10. StarrWulf

    StarrWulf New Egg

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    WOW.. i knew they were loud...[​IMG] when i lived in kansas i could hear the neighbors and he was a mile away... as for sound redirection, I was not wanting to be sound proof, but just redirect it up and away :cool: I am building another coop to do just that. The coop I have now I have old carpet over top and on 3 sides to dampen the noise in every direction I do not want it to go.[​IMG] As it is, just using the carpet dampens the sound to a level you would have to strain to hear it inside. Outside, it sounds like it comes from down the road a bit (which keeps me in the clear). definately ALOT quieter than the dogs my neighbors have.
    [​IMG]
    I will still use old carpet on the outside to dampen what sound escapes. I am considering using the concrete siding boards to help redirect..
     

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