How does a hen increase humidity?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by klf73, Jun 18, 2008.

  1. klf73

    klf73 Mad Scientist

    Jun 1, 2008
    Maine
    Ok, this may be a silly question, but, everyone says to increase humidity the last 3 days. How does the hen do this?
    Krista
     
  2. McGoo

    McGoo Chillin' With My Peeps

    Good question. I'll be looking for the answer too!

    I find that whenever I pick them up their butts are warm as toast... so a broody hen must be really warm and steamy
     
  3. morelcabin

    morelcabin Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 8, 2007
    Ontario Canada
    My broody hens were always sweaty underneath the last couple of days before hatching, and all I could feel was skin, no feathers
     
  4. s6bee

    s6bee Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2007
    Western, NY
    I was going to suggest maybe she gets sweaty.
     
  5. Tuffoldhen

    Tuffoldhen Flock Mistress

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    Jan 30, 2007
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    I'd say her hormones/body knows when to kick into high gear and she sets tight on the eggs....thats my high technical answer [​IMG]
     
  6. dacjohns

    dacjohns People Cracker Upper

    I don't think chickens or any other birds have sweat glands.

    There might be some water vapor loss through the skin that helps with the humidity under a brooding hen. Just speculating.
     
  7. ChiefZero

    ChiefZero Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 16, 2008
    personally I would think that the temp is from the hen and eggs, but more hens, but the humidity is actually the egg. When you think about it they can "sweat" and in a small area they would actually increase the humidity, and the inside of a egg is very wet and the egg's pores would allow some moisture out. Heat would also help humidty rise......................also magic probably helps! hehe

    just some things I think
    ChiefZero
     
  8. lemurchaser

    lemurchaser Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 11, 2008
    Corvallis, OR
    Also if the hen stops turning the eggs and doesn't move, all the moisture stays there. When she's turning the eggs on a regular basis, she's letting all the humidity out.
     

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