How does one tame a conure?

Discussion in 'Caged Birds - Parrots, Canaries, Finches etc.' started by 4 Georgia Hens, Jun 16, 2017.

  1. 4 Georgia Hens

    4 Georgia Hens Crowing

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    image.jpeg image.jpeg Okay, so recently a friend found a wild conure living in his roof and gave the bird to us. We took it to the vet (and discovered that it was a girl) to make sure it was healthy with no mites. And it was all good..... until the biting started. All of the sudden; this bird went from super sweet and kind, to a ferocious monster!!!!! DOES ANYONE KNOW WHAT TO DO?!!!! We have tried doing a lot of things but nothing is working! I NEED to keep my flesh people! Please help!!!!
     
  2. Texas Kiki

    Texas Kiki Egg Pusher

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    You could send it back to where it came from.
    :fl
     
  3. 4 Georgia Hens

    4 Georgia Hens Crowing

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    Well, we did consider it but in the end we decided against it and bought the bird a huge cage. So that's not an option.
     
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  4. Texas Kiki

    Texas Kiki Egg Pusher

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    Ok..Does she attack you all the time?
    Could you try to work with her daily with food/treats?

    I have no clue how to tame a wild bird, or if it is even possible.
     
  5. Texas Kiki

    Texas Kiki Egg Pusher

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  6. 4 Georgia Hens

    4 Georgia Hens Crowing

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    I think it's possible...... Anyway thanks for the link! She always bites our fingers when we change her food or water and when we pet her....
     
  7. Texas Kiki

    Texas Kiki Egg Pusher

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    keep a treat in your hand..i would think food/treats could train anything.
    Be patient and work at it daily..I'm sure it can be don!:thumbsup
     
  8. 4 Georgia Hens

    4 Georgia Hens Crowing

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    Okay!
     
  9. lastco

    lastco Songster

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    I've had conures, green cheeks and suns. They're great, but I must admit they are biters. Not all of them, but it does seem to be a conure thing. Even hand reared conures seem more nippy than other parrots I've kept. The green cheeks especially, but each bird has it's own personality. Some are naughtier than others.

    These birds are smart. Don't react too much (and I know that's difficult) and don't reward bad behavior. Sometimes we do that and don't even realize it because smart birds quite enjoy when we scream in pain. It's fun and exciting to elicit a reaction from the humans. Lol. Treats are the way to any bird's heart, but not when they're defleshing your fingers! Some of the birds I've had were not treated especially well in the past, and if they can bond and develop manners, then there's hope for any bird.

    I also don't let birds on my shoulder or around my head/face until they prove they can behave. It's hard to manage, but I like my eyeballs. Conures were especially responsive to training activities. They learn tricks very quickly and it really helps with bonding.
     
  10. NanaKat

    NanaKat Crossing the Road

    Conures are parrots so any training ideas you research will be helpful.
    I had conures and lovebirds for many years.
    Patience along with some leather gloves like goatskin will be essential.
    Rewarding bad behavior no matter what you do encourages bad behavior. Just like children who act out to get any kind of attention, parrots learn to do the same.
    Praise her when she plays with toys, takes a treat from your fingers...mine loved sunflower seeds.

    When putting in food and water wear the gloves and talk to her. If she attempts to bite your hand withdraw without saying anything and cover the cage with a towel or sheet. This blocks her view of "her people". After 10 minutes remove the cover from the cage and make another attempt to supply her cage.

    When removing her from her cage for petting, she needs to learn the "step up" command. Wear the gloves until she can be trusted. Put out your finger to her perch in front of her and give the command. Nudge her feet until she steps on your finger. Offer a treat before she nips you and praise her for the step up.

    I would suspect that your neighbor had some wood damage in the attic. Parrots love to chew on wood and many toys are made from wood, leather and coconut.

    Conures are long lived birds and she can become a sweet loving bird with your kindness and persistence.
     
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