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How does the buff gene work?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Godiva, Jun 29, 2008.

  1. Godiva

    Godiva Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 17, 2007
    Colorado
    If I cross a barred roo with a buff hen what then? HOW does it work? I found a cool offspring calculator (with guitartists help!) but I don't see how the buff gets figured in. I crossed a BO roo with a speckled sussex hen and got these beautiful dark red roosters. BUt now I am wondering what will happen if I cross some of my other roos with a buff hen instead...
     
  2. Godiva

    Godiva Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 17, 2007
    Colorado
    Ok, wasnt thinking too clearly... I know that all the offspring would be barred if the daddy was barred, but what happens with the base colour? What happens with the buff when you cross it with other colours?
     
  3. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    If you look toward the bottom there is a link for Buff [​IMG] Apparently it functions differently than the other colors genes... or is more complicated or something...LOL Just when you thought it couldn't get MORE complicated, right? [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  4. Bossroo

    Bossroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 15, 2008
    So, where is this link for Buff? How does it function differently from the red?
     
  5. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
  6. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    Jan 13, 2008
    Sun City, California
    Yeah where's the link? Whoops, there's the link now thanks!

    Buff is not one gene. It is combination of several genes to achieve the solid buff color. It IS complicated and may not be fully understood, may even be more than one way to create a solid buff bird. The only thing I know is that often Wheaten, Columbian and sometimes Dominant White is part of the make up.

    Afraid to comment here as I am not sure, think the difference between buff and red is due to gold pigment intensifiers for reds such as Mahogany.

    I have a pullet that is a cross between Buff Orpington and a WLR Cornish. She is solid light buff like a Buff, except she does have some white in tail if you look close. WLR have red intensifiers BTW.. same as in a RIR. Otherwise they would be "buff laced" as in buff laced Polish.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2008
  7. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    My only problem with the whole calculator thing is that if there is recessive genes in your birds breeding that you are unaware of, there is no way to put them in [​IMG] Not a problem with the calculator of course [​IMG] But, I wonder... there must be a color that can be breed to certain other colors to pull out or show what is hidden.... maybe????
     
  8. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    If you are unaware of it, then you cannot use it in the calculator anyways. Every gene basically has to be considered on a case by case basis so there cannot be a single color to test mate for recessives or what have you. However, ALL mutant genes are test mated against the wild type(the original animal's color and appearence) to figure out if said mutant is dominant, recessive, etc. However just because mutant A is dominant over wild type does not necessarily mean it is also dominant over another mutant..

    What you describe is called test mating, which is done to see if a particular bird is carrying a recessive trait or is pure for a trait. Again this depends on what trait it is. If the gene of concern is a recessive white, you need to test mate the bird with a recessive white. This won't work if the gene of concern is a lavender- you would have to test mate the bird with a lavender.

    It's standard to assume two parents are pure when giving an answer or using a product like the link. To try to factor in possibilities makes for a WAY too long post.. that is something I often worry about when answering a post on genetics.

    "What do I get if I cross a black with a..." are far far far more complicated than it seems at all- first, WHAT black does the bird have? There are at least 3 completely different common genes that help with creating a black chicken....
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2008
  9. Bossroo

    Bossroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 15, 2008
    Fun stuff...I tried the calculator for a buff roo x white hen and vice versa... it shows white roos and hens, chocolate roos and hens , and black roos and hens. Does this occur in real life? or do you also get buff ( or washed out dilute buff)?
     
  10. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    Thanks Kev [​IMG] [​IMG] Yeah, that's the fun part though I guess [​IMG] Haha! At least when you're like me and don't mind a few recessive colors popping up now and again [​IMG] Probably not much fun if you are trying to breed true to a standard [​IMG]
     

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