How long do ducklings need heat?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Allie Grace Sanders, Mar 20, 2018.

  1. Allie Grace Sanders

    Allie Grace Sanders Songster

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    I have three Rouen ducklings that are a couple of days old (I think). They are in a rubber-made tote as of now. They are so cute! Question above^. Any other advise would be lovely, thank you!
     
  2. sylviethecochin

    sylviethecochin Free Ranging

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    It depends on how you raise them. If they're used to steady temperature control, then being off of it will hurt them. That's part of why so many people on here prefer Manna Heating Pads--The ducklings leave the heat pad to eat and drink, and slowly adjust to being out in the cold that way. I myself use a heat lamp, but I want one end of the brooder to be at least ten degrees cooler than the other, and fifteen is better.

    I'm unfamiliar with Indiana weather, but during the summers, I often raise Swedish outdoors with no supplemental heat, except at night, after they're a week old.

    Ducklings don't need as much heat as chicks do.

    Good luck!
     
    Allie Grace Sanders likes this.
  3. AppleChicks

    AppleChicks In the Brooder

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    My jumbo pekins never used the heating pad when they were housed inside. They were probably around a week old when I got them. I had it in there with them but they avoided the heat.

    I moved them outside when they were probably around 4 weeks old. They have mama heating pad in their coop and use it often. I am in WI and it has been in the 20's at night. They are 100% fine and happy outside with Mama heating pad.

    If it is sunny or in the 40's I let them out on the grass with no heating for the day. The ground is normally warm enough they are happy. They sometimes cuddle in a small 3 sided enclosure, I know then they are cold and need to go back into the coop with mama heating pad.

    But they are Jumbo's and are super fat and fluffy feathered.
     
  4. FunkyFarmFlocks

    FunkyFarmFlocks Chirping

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    I might be able to be of some help since I've been raising a good chunk of our birds inside, and also hail from Indiana:thumbsup. I raised each group with a heating lamp until they were about 4 weeks old before taking them completely off the heat. At about 1 1/2-2 weeks, I moved the lamp away about twice as high so they don't overheat. If your duckies start panting, they need less heat or more of a covered space to cool off. I don't have any experience with heating pads so I can't speak about those, but would also like to know more on that issue.
    When you start taking your ducks completely off of heat, monitor how they act. If they start huddling together and lying around more often, then they are cold and need more heat. As far as moving them outside goes, I've been aiming around 7-9 weeks old for our current weather conditions. My first set went outside about a month ago and they were exactly 7 weeks old but had their feathers in and had an excellent reaction. I'm currently waiting any moment to move my second set outside. They're almost 8 weeks old but they're feather development is behind the first sets.
    Paying attention to their temperament is going to be the best way to read your birds. If they start panting, find a way to lower the heat for them. If they start huddling together all the time, especially on top of each other, raise their heat! Always make sure they have water and never leave food out when there is absolutely no water around. Keep up on the cleaning, don't let it get to a point where you can start to smell ammonia. Hope this little bit helps out! Good luck and most importantly, have fun!
     
  5. AppleChicks

    AppleChicks In the Brooder

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    Mama heating pad is amazing! Just search for it using the search bar on this forum. Basically it is just using a heating pad instead of a heat lamp for warmth. The benefits are the chicks wont be in light 24/7. They will be happier and healthier for that alone. It is also much easier for them to self regulate. They can go under the dome you create with the heating pad for max warmth, or on top or next to for less. I like that with larger ducklings you can use it flat in their coop and they can lay on it if they want for warmth. That allowed me to move mine outside earlier than I would have been able to with a heat lamp. I would not want to use a heat lamp in a coop outside due to fire risk.
     
    Miss Lydia likes this.
  6. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Loving this country life

    :goodpost:
     
  7. RedHed2Fred

    RedHed2Fred Hatching

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    Mar 23, 2018
    Our ducklings are about a week old. They lay in a pile and a couple of them pant....what in the quack are they doing?!
     
    Miss Lydia likes this.
  8. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Loving this country life

    Sounds like they are too warm what breed and what temp in your brooder?
     
  9. RedHed2Fred

    RedHed2Fred Hatching

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    Two Pekins, three mallards and I have 2 that I don't know what breed they are. They are all the same age. They were outside in a coop most of the day. The weather was pleasant. We bring them in the house in a deep plastic tub and we usually keep a heat lamp with a 75wt. bulb instead of the heat bulb. I'm going to leave the light off tonight but I'm hesitant to leave them outside because it gets cold during the night.
     
  10. RedHed2Fred

    RedHed2Fred Hatching

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    Baby ducks.jpg Can anyone tell me what breed the two ducks are with the black spots on top of their heads? I know the larger yellow/white ones are Pekin and the ones closest to the right side of the picture are mallards. I haven't been able to identify the remaining two ducks....???
     

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