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How many rooster should you have in a flock

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Beth 67, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. Beth 67

    Beth 67 New Egg

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    May 13, 2011
    Right now I have a flock of 16 hen and 7 rooster. Currently only two of the hen are laying on a regular bases. I am wondering if the reason my hen are not laying is their being harassed by the rooster. Any suggestion to this problem would be helpful.
     
  2. Mike Winters

    Mike Winters Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 13, 2011
    i think the ratio is 1 male for every 8 females for chickens
     
  3. jeslewmazer

    jeslewmazer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 24, 2009
    Mississippi
    The most I would have with 16 hen would be about 3 roosters. What age are the hens? If the roosters are causing too much commotion in the flock, then it could affect egg production. Time of the year, weather, diet, other stress factors, age, molt, etc. all can affect egg production. If they are still young (under 1yr old) you might have to wait until they are ready to start.
     
  4. jeslewmazer

    jeslewmazer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 24, 2009
    Mississippi
    In some cases.
    Some people say between 8-12 hens for every 1rooster.
    More like 1:10 average, but some roosters are more like 1:5 up to about 1:15. The rooster's fertility and how he treats his hens would determine more so how the ratio should be set up. Other reasons and ratios to different people and flocks.
     
  5. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    At this time of year, egg production is more a function of season (tail end of moult) than number of roosters. Egg production should jump up shortly as day lenght increases, especially if temperatures are presently low.

    You do not indicate how birds are housed nor your objectives. If eggs for table and birds are well protected fro predators, then no roosters are needed. If eggs to be hatched, then a single rooster to every 6 to 10 hens will do. If birds are to be free ranged and predators such as hawks expected, then fewer hens per rooster will help control some losses to hawks and at least increase your ability to hear when a predator is trying to take a member of flock.

    For fun, I set up so mulitple flocks are present, each with a rooster (sometimes two), a roost, and a feeding station. This requires some acreage but can be done and can be quit intertaining when the flocks interact.
     

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