How often can you use ivermectin without causing resistance?

It_is_I_Rae

Songster
Oct 30, 2019
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I treated my chickens with topical ivermetcin almost a year ago for lice and leg mites. I think it took care of the lice because I haven't really seen any on my chickens since then but they appear to still have leg mites. The legs mites have been an ongoing problem for a few years now. There don't seem to be a lot of options for treating it. I've tried different treatments over the years like dipping their legs in vegetable oil, which didn't work because it was too messy and the chickens kept spilling and trying to drink the oil, Vaseline, which is less of a hassle than oil but also very messy and causes bedding to stick to their feet, and topical ivermetcin. Most of them don't have it very bad but a couple of their feet look rough. Should I try Ivermetcin again or will using it again cause parasites to become resistant? Are there any treatments for leg mites that are more effective?
 

dawg53

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I dont recommend Ivermectin since it has a long egg withdrawal period, 30 days.
Use Nu-Stock to treat scaly leg mites. You can find it in the Equine section at a feed store. Shake the tube well and wear disposable gloves before applying it on their legs. Put a light coat on roosts, the mites can can crawl from one bird to another on the roosts.
Keep in mind that scaly leg mites eat tissue and can literally eat through a chickens leg or toe.
thnustock.jpg
 

Shadrach

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Most of them don't have it very bad but a couple of their feet look rough.
While various treatments for Scaly Leg mite are reasonably well known, what doesn't seem to be so well known is that the legs will not look normal again until the chickenn has shed the old lifted scales and regrown new ones.
It's a bit like feather damage from feather mite. The feathers don't return to their former healthy state. What happens is the chicken sheds the old damaged feathers and replaces them with new.
So while the chickens legs still look bad, that doesn't necessarily mean the mites are still alive and active.
The next thing is mites lay eggs and most treatments do not kill the eggs, they only kill the live mites.
So, it isn't usually a question of treating once and the problem is solved. You need a series of treaments to make sure that the newly hatched mites from the eggs of the ones you've killed get killed as well.
It's an ongoing problem.
The solution adopted by some chicken keepers is when inspecting the chickens, say once a week or whatever shedule fits your flock size and circunstances they apply a coat of Vasaline to their chickens legs.
 

It_is_I_Rae

Songster
Oct 30, 2019
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I dont recommend Ivermectin since it has a long egg withdrawal period, 30 days.
Use Nu-Stock to treat scaly leg mites. You can find it in the Equine section at a feed store. Shake the tube well and wear disposable gloves before applying it on their legs. Put a light coat on roosts, the mites can can crawl from one bird to another on the roosts.
Keep in mind that scaly leg mites eat tissue and can literally eat through a chickens leg or toe.
View attachment 2911796
I've never heard of using nustock before, I'll have to try that. I also had no idea leg mites eat through leg tissue. I thought they just irritated the skin. That's good to know, Thank you for telling me. Before I go use it on my chickens, are there any risks to using nustock?
 

It_is_I_Rae

Songster
Oct 30, 2019
275
253
161
I dont recommend Ivermectin since it has a long egg withdrawal period, 30 days.
Use Nu-Stock to treat scaly leg mites. You can find it in the Equine section at a feed store. Shake the tube well and wear disposable gloves before applying it on their legs. Put a light coat on roosts, the mites can can crawl from one bird to another on the roosts.
Keep in mind that scaly leg mites eat tissue and can literally eat through a chickens leg or toe.
View attachment 2911796
Oh also how often does it need to be applied
 

Eggcessive

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You can apply Nutstock as often as needed to coat the legs. It is sulfur powder combined with pine oil and a base of mineral oil. You can even make it yourself. The tube may become difficult to use, but you can empty the tune into a small container to use it. It is also used on red areas to discourage pecking, and on irritated vents from vent gleet.
 

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