How often to apply iodine for Fowl Pox?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Chocobo, Nov 24, 2011.

  1. Chocobo

    Chocobo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So it seems my chickens have Fowl Pox. Not nearly as bad as some of the pictures I've seen but still I want to treat it so they are as comfortable as possible.
    The recommended course of action seems to be using a cotton ball or qtip to apply some iodine to the lesions.
    What I can't find is how often you are supposed to do this.
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    I used dilute Betadine, once. For those with lesions very close to eyes or mouth, I used Neosporin ointment instead, as it is safe to put in eyes. It's only used to prevent secondary bacterial infection, so unless you see a lesion showing sign of infection, once should be enough. Actually, a simple, dry lesion doesn't require any treatment in many cases. They will run their viral course and suddenly go away after about 3 weeks.
     
  3. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    I've used iodine once a day on the scabs to help dry them up quicker. As Flockwatcher mentioned, to avoid the eyes and nostrils, neosporin can be used. Some people use black shoe polish to put on the scabs as well.
     
  4. Chocobo

    Chocobo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:What are the advantages/disadvantages of using iodine vs. neosporin besides being safe around the eyes?
    And what on earth does the black shoe polish do?
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2011
  5. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When our flock had fowl pox, I tried once to apply iodine. The poor chicken struggled and squawked so much during the process that I decided it was just too stressful for both of us.

    Our little roo developed wet pox and you could tell he felt poorly. We started giving him oral antibiotics and he perked right up, so he must have had a secondary bacterial infection. The other birds had only dry pox, and they did not act sick in any way. The looked awful, but they seemed to feel fine, so I didn't do anything at all for them and they all recovered fine.
     

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