how should i pet him?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Shortstuff112, Oct 22, 2012.

  1. Shortstuff112

    Shortstuff112 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a blue Maran roo and he lets me pick him up but he doesnt seem to be comfortable! is there any way i could pet him to soothe him? And he doesnt have any problems with his organs, bones ect.[​IMG]
     
  2. countrygoddess

    countrygoddess Chillin' With My Peeps

    By uncomfortable, do you mean he is straining while you hold him? Trying to hook his nails in your shirt, etc? That could be he's just trying to get down because he doesn't like to be held much. Don't worry, it's not you. That's how a lot of chickens, and particularly cocks, are. I pick my cockerels up a lot to keep them comfortable with me. While I hold them, I use the hand of the arm that I have them laying across to hold their legs so they can't flail. I have holes in more than one shirt because of those claws! Then I just stroke them and rub their combs and wattles. Sometimes they close their eyes like maybe they're enjoying it. I like to think so, anyway. =)
     
  3. DenverEmily

    DenverEmily New Egg

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    Train him!

    We started using meal worm treats to train our hens to let us pick them up. Think about dog training - it is very similar. Example: week 1, once a day, say "treats" and throw a few mealworms in the run and keep your distance. Week 2, once a day, say "treats" and stay kneeling down near them while they gobble them up. Week 3, once a day, say "treats" let them eat out of your hand. When we got to week three, I actually had a barred rock hen jump into my lap while I was sitting on the deck, minding my own business, eating an oatmeal cookie. No kidding.

    My son can now walk up, calmly, to several of our chickens and pick them up. We make a point of not holding them very long, so that they know that we will not keep them captive - another point of training. Often, while holding them we will take the opportunity to check under their wings, vent, etc. and then set them down gently. This is a very practical benefit of this training - we can check their health without stressing them.

    Also noteworthy: We used to chase them to catch them. I used to allow the kids to "play" with them. We thought this would tame them. It actually had the opposite effect and they were flighty and wouldn't lay eggs. We don't this anymore. They are more friendly and are laying eggs.
     
  4. Shortstuff112

    Shortstuff112 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    thank you for that advice, i will use that in the future. But Ronnie ( thats his name) is very loyall and he follows me anywere even if hes scared and he loves to run up and eat out of my hand but when i pick him up he just doesnt like it , and im just wondering if i can pet him a certain way to relax him
     
  5. Shortstuff112

    Shortstuff112 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    oh yeah! countrygodess- thank you! i will try to pet him that way! thanks
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. Spikes Chooks

    Spikes Chooks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Try putting his favourite treat on your lap and I think he will soon jump up to eat it. Then maybe stay a little longer. My girls that do this may just jump straight off but often will sit down for a little warm rest on my knee. Then I gently and slowly stroke along the back. Take care not to block his view with your hand or crowd him in so he feels too captive. After a while he may just jump up for a look and a pat. It is a great way to check them over, feel their breastbone for weight check, check their wings, for mites etc. So by getting him comfortable with this, under his own choice, it has a practical purpose as well as being enjoyable - for you both!

    BTW it may not work of course! I have a Barenvelder which never jumps up on my lap and does not consider any treat worth doing this. She can even give the others funny looks when she sees them up on me. Like "Ugh!!! You're on HER". I doubt I'll ever get a pat willingly from her, but who knows. I'm patient.....

    Good luck
     
  7. Shortstuff112

    Shortstuff112 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    thank you! i will try that and tell you how it goes!
     
  8. RedDrgn

    RedDrgn Anachronistic Anomaly

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    My Coop
    Personally, I'd say that it's enough that you are able to pick him up. Roos don't tend to be terribly cuddly or as social with people as hens can be. If you're holding him, then you're keeping him from being with his girls and doing his roosterly oversight duty, which could make him a bit wiley when held. While ours will let you pick him up, he doesn't like to be held for long and will keeping stretching towards his ladies if his restraint is prolonged.
     

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