how temp sensitive are they on 1st days?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by bluesGuy, Feb 10, 2012.

  1. bluesGuy

    bluesGuy Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 11, 2012
    Wasco CA.
    i put 24 eggs in the bator all was well then someone left the nearby window open all of night #1. in the morn the temp was down to 96.5, it would not go back to 99.5 very fast. took a couple hours. does anyone know if the eggs were harmed badly, or should they be just fine?

    thanks in advance
     
  2. peepblessed

    peepblessed Chillin' With My Peeps

    I don't think there will be a problem. [​IMG]
     
  3. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    +1

    If anything, they will be a bit delayed on hatch day. Embryos can still develop at 95F, just slower.
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I think they will be fine so don't let what I'm about to say scare you. They are temperature sensitive, but the damage is much more likely to come from too high a temperature than too low. Body parts and organs are forming in the first few days. If the temperature is too high, this can lead to problems. Turning is also important at this time for the same reason. You want the body parts to form in the right place.

    Another thing to consider is that the air temperature in the incubator is not necessarily the temperature inside the egg. It takes a long time for the interior of the egg itself to cool down.

    Obviously what happened is not recommended to try, but I really doubt they will be harmed.
     
  5. crankster76

    crankster76 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I dont think you have anything to worry about. the cooler temp if anything might help ur roo to hen ratio as that is determined at the earlier stages as well from all that I have studied..
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    The sex of the chick is determined by the hen when she donates her genetic material to the egg. It has nothing to do with what temperature the eggs are incubated at. That works for some reptiles, but chickens are not reptiles.

    Supposedly males can survive higher incubating temperatures than females, so you might get more males than females if your incubating temperatures are too high. But that is not because the eggs magically turned from female to male. That's because some of the females died and more roosters survived. From my experience, I don't believe this one either. My incubaor runs a tad hot and I've had several hatches with more females than males.
     
  7. bluesGuy

    bluesGuy Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 11, 2012
    Wasco CA.
    thanks everybody, im very relieved.
     

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