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How to build a killing cone.

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by price403, Aug 20, 2010.

  1. price403

    price403 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 17, 2010
    Ivydale, WV
    Quote:I would make a cone using 26 gauge steel only. Aluminum is not strong enough to handle the weight of a turkey. Personally I've never made a kill cone for turkey but I'd make it 24 inches tall, 7 inches for bottom opening and 16 inches for the top. That would mean making a pattern 24 inches tall, 24 inches on the narrow side and 52 inches on the long side. You'll probably need 5 rivets for it instead of 3 like with the broiler cone.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2010
  2. price403

    price403 Out Of The Brooder

    32
    2
    24
    Aug 17, 2010
    Ivydale, WV
    Quote:For the Cornish cross you could make a cone 18 inches tall, with a 5 inch botttom opening and 12 inch top opening. That would be a pattern 18 inches tall, 17 inches wide on the narrow side and 39 inches on the long side.

    The basic formula I use is diameter of the opening (D) multiplied by Pi (3.14) plus 1.5 to 2 inches. [ (D x Pi) + 1.5 ] That gives you the length of the metal for the opening plus an overlap to fasten the two sides with.

    I'm thinking about cutting up some of the free buckets I get and making some plastic kill cones with them. I could weld the cone's seam with a scrap piece of the plastic and a pocket torch. Then I'd have a kill cone with no overlapping seam. It would be much easier to clean.
     
  3. MMPoultryFarms

    MMPoultryFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2010
    Okarche Oklahoma
    Quote:For the Cornish cross you could make a cone 18 inches tall, with a 5 inch botttom opening and 12 inch top opening. That would be a pattern 18 inches tall, 17 inches wide on the narrow side and 39 inches on the long side.

    The basic formula I use is diameter of the opening (D) multiplied by Pi (3.14) plus 1.5 to 2 inches. [ (D x Pi) + 1.5 ] That gives you the length of the metal for the opening plus an overlap to fasten the two sides with.

    I'm thinking about cutting up some of the free buckets I get and making some plastic kill cones with them. I could weld the cone's seam with a scrap piece of the plastic and a pocket torch. Then I'd have a kill cone with no overlapping seam. It would be much easier to clean.

    wow you hit the nail on the head that is perfect for a CxR it measures exactly what my mutilated cone measures now Thanks alot and thanks for the pictures your way is sure a ton easier then mine. Its BYC'ers like you who help guys like me learn and process new things, that make life that much easier thank again for all the great info.
     
  4. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

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    Jan 27, 2009
    Enumclaw
    Quote:There are different sizes of traffic cones. It may be possible to check with your county's road operations and see if they have a really large one that they no longer use.
     
  5. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

    7,878
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    Jan 27, 2009
    Enumclaw
    I do really like th look of the cone made from flashing, maybe next year we will upgrade to one.
     
  6. gmendoza

    gmendoza Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 23, 2010
    Rock Hill,SC
    Traffic cones are better,especially when they are stolen.. LOL!.

    I just use an axe...quick ..easy.
     
  7. price403

    price403 Out Of The Brooder

    32
    2
    24
    Aug 17, 2010
    Ivydale, WV
    Quote:For the Cornish cross you could make a cone 18 inches tall, with a 5 inch botttom opening and 12 inch top opening. That would be a pattern 18 inches tall, 17 inches wide on the narrow side and 39 inches on the long side.

    The basic formula I use is diameter of the opening (D) multiplied by Pi (3.14) plus 1.5 to 2 inches. [ (D x Pi) + 1.5 ] That gives you the length of the metal for the opening plus an overlap to fasten the two sides with.

    I'm thinking about cutting up some of the free buckets I get and making some plastic kill cones with them. I could weld the cone's seam with a scrap piece of the plastic and a pocket torch. Then I'd have a kill cone with no overlapping seam. It would be much easier to clean.

    wow you hit the nail on the head that is perfect for a CxR it measures exactly what my mutilated cone measures now Thanks alot and thanks for the pictures your way is sure a ton easier then mine. Its BYC'ers like you who help guys like me learn and process new things, that make life that much easier thank again for all the great info.

    MMPoultryFarms,
    You're very welcome. I'm just glad I could be of assistance.
     
  8. Mortimer

    Mortimer Out Of The Brooder

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    39
    May 6, 2008
    SW of Wichita, KS
    Just wanted to thank you for this great post! We have been hanging ours by the legs using heavy twine, just too messy, plus occasionally they wriggle loose. Also have had problems with them breaking their wings while they spaz out.

    Been looking at buying a few of these but just couldn't bring myself to spend $25-$30 apiece on something I knew I could make for a few dollars.

    Spent just over $50 at Home Depot this evening on a 25ft roll of 18" flashing, pop rivet gun and rivets, and have enough material to make probably 7 or 8 of these. Took maybe 30 minutes to form up the three I needed. Once you get the first one measured out it's easy, just reverse the design for the next one (trailing edge of first cone becomes leading edge of second cone) and there's no wasted material at all.

    Can't wait to try these out -- my meaties are looking heavy, next Saturday is the big day!
     
  9. Saltysteele

    Saltysteele Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 10, 2011
    MI
    we've used cones for turkeys in the past, but it was a really big cone; haven't seen one like it in a while.

    we haven't done but 1 at a time for years and years, though. for single birds, we've found it's easiest to put them in a large woven bag (like a rye seed bag) with a corner cut out big enough for the head and neck to poke out of, and tie or zip tie the feet. wrap the bag tightly around the bird, and it's very easy to handle them (provided you have a second person to do the deed).

    i remember years ago holding onto one wing while my cousin held the other, and holding on for dear life (or fear of getting hit)
     
  10. wsmoak

    wsmoak Chillin' With My Peeps

    Excellent instructions! I only had trouble with step 8 and 9 -- I could *not* get it rolled up to look like #9, until I realized there must be a

    Step 8.5: cut off the triangle of metal that sticks up

    We made one yesterday and used it today for our practice bird -- scrawny little Wyandotte rooster that was hardly worth the effort except that I wanted a bit of practice on something that I wouldn't feel bad about tossing the entire thing if it all went wrong. He's in the dutch oven now, there might be a mouthful or two of meat for dinner. [​IMG]

    -Wendy
     

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