How to fix a yard destroyed by ducks?

matt14132

Chirping
Oct 16, 2017
48
53
69
Sanborn, NY
Good morning all,

The weather is starting to turn around and I don't believe that I will see any more snow this year.(At least not anything more than a dusting on a few odd days)

All of the snow melted today because we almost reached 55 degrees. Feels like I should have the AC on already after some of the sub zero spans we had this winter.

As I look around the yard, what a mess. Its a mud pit thanks to my ducks. It happens every time the snow melts a little and the melted snow makes the top layer of ground mushy and the ducks love to dig their bills back and forth in it, and turning the yard into almost like a quick sand.....if that makes sense.

I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions about how to repair the lawn so that the chickens can free range without standing in 3 inches of mud? I can tell it really bothers the chickens and I don't think it is healthy for their feet right?

I guess a simple fix would be throw down some grass seed, keep the chickens and ducks cooped up until some of the grass is strong enough and hope that it all fills in......

I am not an expert on grass, so maybe some of you have experience in this.

Thank you all in advance for your help and input,
Matt
 

ChickenCanoe

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Nov 23, 2010
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Grass may be good for ducks but not the best forage for chickens. It tends to be too fibrous and is also low in nutrition. Better options are alfalfa, white clovers like ladino and dutch, forage type turnips (7-top), radish, beets, field peas for cold weather and buckwheat for warm weather. Once planted, cover the area with straw. The chickens will benefit from having the straw to walk on.
 

ChickenCanoe

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Nov 23, 2010
33,285
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St. Louis, MO
They will absolutely dig the straw but it will keep the seed moist while it sprouts. It will also help the chickens' feet.
It will also be necessary to keep all the animals off of it till the greens get established. Once established, alfalfa is hard to kill.
 

matt14132

Chirping
Oct 16, 2017
48
53
69
Sanborn, NY
I bought some clover seed for this purpose, thinking it would be good to mix with some grass seed.

There was already quire a bit of clover in the yard last year but I don't really care if its grass, clover, alfalfa, etc. Im just happy to see green. :yesss:

I can use whatever is left over to sprout in trays when it gets a tad warmer...
 

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