how to tell which duck laid egg?

KaleIAm

Crowing
Jul 13, 2015
665
1,236
281
Carnation, Wa
I used to think I could tell, when I had 6 ducks laying daily. I was very confident. In truth I could only tell which egg was layed by my cayuga who layed black/grey eggs. I only realized this when one of my ducks passed away. The egg I was sure was hers continued appearing everyday.

Now I have 3 and can tell, because I have had to isolate them for medical reasons. If they are in a cage alone and produce an egg that's theirs. If you see it come out of them, it is theirs. Otherwise you are guessing and will perhaps be wrong for years.
 

416bigbore

Pretty Girl
Premium Feather Member
Jun 11, 2020
922
1,483
226
NC
I used to think I could tell, when I had 6 ducks laying daily. I was very confident. In truth I could only tell which egg was layed by my cayuga who layed black/grey eggs. I only realized this when one of my ducks passed away. The egg I was sure was hers continued appearing everyday.

Now I have 3 and can tell, because I have had to isolate them for medical reasons. If they are in a cage alone and produce an egg that's theirs. If you see it come out of them, it is theirs. Otherwise you are guessing and will perhaps be wrong for years.
We have twelve hen Ducks and four Isa Brown hens who all have started laying eggs in the same coop. I am pretty sure I know where the dark brown eggs are coming from! :lau
 

NatJ

Crowing
Mar 20, 2017
3,584
5,636
366
USA
my one girl just turned 18 weeks! my other girl had been laying for awhile but how do i tell who is laying it?
Do you mean that for quite a while you've been getting one egg each day, and now you're getting 2? In that case, the new egg comes from the new layer.

Or that both ducks are new to you, and you're getting one egg but not sure who is laying it?

Putting them in separate pens for a day or two can certainly sort it out.

With chickens, you can tell who's laying by looking at their vents. Does it work with ducks, too? The males are certainly not laying any eggs, so you could look at them for an example of a not-layer, then see if either female looks different. With chickens, a male or not-layer has a small puckered vent, while a layer has a vent that is larger, looks more moist, and looks stretchy. I think of it as, "could an egg possibly come out of that vent?"
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom