Hubbard meat chicks?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Merryment, Jul 27, 2011.

  1. Merryment

    Merryment Chillin' With My Peeps

    110
    1
    91
    Jan 20, 2011
    Anyone use these? The white ones, I mean; I think most red broilers come from Hubbard as well. There's a place here that raises a lot of the white hubbards to butcher and sell, and they will sometimes sell the chicks when they get them. Just curious about the differences between them and cornish x.
     
  2. bigredfeather

    bigredfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,194
    28
    211
    Oct 1, 2008
    Yorkshire, Ohio
    Quote:They are Cornish X. Hubbard is the company that produces them.
     
  3. Merryment

    Merryment Chillin' With My Peeps

    110
    1
    91
    Jan 20, 2011
    I'm not saying you're wrong, but Hubbard says not, that they grow slower the first few weeks, allowing for stonger bones, before putting on weight at a quicker clip. Interesting to see that Hubbard also produces the red broilers as a Label Rouge option.

    I only know what I read on their web site, and it made me curious. Thanks!
     
  4. bigredfeather

    bigredfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,194
    28
    211
    Oct 1, 2008
    Yorkshire, Ohio
    Quote:I could be wrong. I did find this:

    From Wilkipedia

    "A broiler is a type of chicken raised specifically for meat production. Modern commercial broilers, typically known as Cornish crosses or Cornish-Rocks are specially bred for large scale, efficient meat production and grow much faster than egg or traditional dual purpose breeds. They are noted for having very fast growth rates, a high feed conversion ratio, and low levels of activity. Broilers often reach a harvest weight of 4-5 pounds dressed in only five weeks.[1]

    They have white feathers and yellowish skin. This cross is also favorable for meat production because it lacks the typical "hair" which many breeds have that necessitates singeing after plucking. Both male and female broilers are slaughtered for their meat. In 2003, approximately 42 billion broilers were produced, 80% of which were produced by four companies: Aviagen, Cobb-Vantress, Hubbard Farms, and Hybro."

    I'm sure the other three companies have some sort of tag line they use to try and set them apart from the competition, but at the end of the day, they will all be close to the same weight at 42 days.
     
  5. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

    5,532
    183
    273
    Apr 14, 2011
    Central Oregon
    It's possible that they have more than one line of meat birds. Well, if they sell both red broilers and Cornish Cross, they definitely have more than one line of meat bird. So maybe they have a white broiler that is not the same as the Cornish Cross.

    I've never bought any, so can't help there.
     
  6. bigredfeather

    bigredfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,194
    28
    211
    Oct 1, 2008
    Yorkshire, Ohio
    You could be right. I don't know for sure.
     
  7. fair weather chicken

    fair weather chicken Out Of The Brooder

    49
    0
    21
    Apr 9, 2011
    the last two years we bought a hubbard white mountain from townline hatchery in zeeland,mi. unfortunately they stopped carrying them. we found them to be hardier than the cornishx we got this year. they seemed to do better on pasture.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by