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Humane way

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ccrawf, Mar 23, 2012.

  1. ccrawf

    ccrawf Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 6, 2009
    Springfield, Missouri
    OK, not sure this is the best place for this, but figured I would start here. Some one should have an idea.

    What is the best way, or most humane way to put a chick down? Not something any of us enjoy, and it breaks my heart, but I think I have come to the comclusion it is the right thing to do. See post under Geese about the crooked neck. He got in his waterer and fell over on his back while we were out today. He's not eating enough I'm afraid and now he can't stand up with out running backwards and falling over.

    No, make no mistake, I DO NOT WANT TO!! But have come to the conclusion that if I don't, he will die anyway, and that would be inhumane and cruel to him. [​IMG] Thanks,

    Clay

    [​IMG]
     
  2. klmclain1

    klmclain1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 14, 2011
    Have you considered giving him some vitamins? He may just have a vitamin deficiency. Polyvisol drops without iron are good and readily available a any pharmacy and probably just about any grocery store too. Try that before putting your little one down. Do a quick search here for polyvisol and dose.
     
  3. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Apr 15, 2009
    Well, after reading his story I think he is pretty lucky to have made it out at all. Chances are good that he is not just suffering from a wry neck caused by a nutritional deficiency. He likely has a hatch defect. The question is can he learn to live with it? The answer being- why bother? He is destined to be dinner, so there is no point in giving him a very hard life and then cutting it short.

    Cervical dislocation is the method of choice for most folks. It is the most humane for the bird on the receiving end. It is a bit harsh on the person performing it. With smaller chicks people often branch loppers to do it, but I think a goose neck might be too thick for that. (It's been a while since I had goslings.) I have a special broad-headed axe that I got specifically to deal with geese. It is wider than a standard axe, so can accomplish the desired result in one strike. There is also the broomstick method where you put the gosling down on the ground with a broomstick across the neck. Step on the broomstick while simultaneously pulling up sharply on the bird's legs. The broomstick should snap its neck cleanly. Any one of those would work.

    I am sorry you feel you have to do this, but you would know best. Good luck.
     
  4. ccrawf

    ccrawf Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 6, 2009
    Springfield, Missouri
    He took a turn for the worse today, spent most of it on his back, even when we righted him.
    It really breaks my heart after you put so much effort into them to loose them like this.
    But having lost others that I tried to hold onto too long, I knew his time was up.
    Thanks for your input.
    Clay
     

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