Humidity Questions for Dry Incubating and Lockdown

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by snaffle, Mar 17, 2015.

  1. snaffle

    snaffle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What is the lowest humidity that is safe for dry incubaiion?

    What is the lowest/highest Humidity for lockdown?
     
  2. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Did you read the article in Hatching 101 regarding dry hatching? I can't answer that, but I do try to follow the recommendations in that article.
     
  3. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    I do dry incubation but only go totally dry if the bator holds 25% w/o water. I have read that 20% and below can be dangerous. I don't know if that is theory or has anything backing it, but I'm not taking the chances. If my bator doesn't stay 25% and above I add just enough water to try to keep it around 30%.

    As far as lockdown, the recommended LEAST amount is 65%. I prefer 75%. One of the considerations at lockdown to determine what is "safe" for you, I believe, is your methodology and habits. If you are a hands off after lockdown then chances are you'll have a successful hatch with a less percentage. If you are a "meddler" (like me,) and prefer to pull your chicks before the end of hatch or assist if it is needed, then you're better off at a higher percentage.
     
  4. snaffle

    snaffle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I pulled up that article and it was one loooong page of information. I never did find the part about incubation
     
  5. snaffle

    snaffle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you. That is what I wanted to know. I have found my incubator below 20 a few times this hatch, and immediately add water ...even use the spray bottle and mist the eggs. These eggs are scheduled to hatch next week so if my drops in humidity did any damage... I will know then.

    I have read people say that too high of humidity will 'drown' the chicks... how can they tell the chicks drowned?
     
  6. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Drops and spikes of humidity doesn't damage the eggs, it keeps the eggs from loosing the moisture they need to loose for the air cells to develop properly. If your bator drops to 20% humidity...not an issue-if you add water and bring it up. If you leave it at 20% the whole incubation then chances are you are going to find that your air cells have grown too much (and probably chick problems because they haven't had enough moisture while developing) and your chick could become shrink wrapped. Humidity needs to be averaged out over the period of incubation so that your eggs loose enough moisture that your air cells grow properly.

    Yes, too high humidity during incubation can lead to drown chicks at hatch. High humidity keeps the eggs from loosing the moisture that they need and allowing the air cells to grow big enough. When the chick goes to pip it is possible that instead of air he pips into that excess moisture and drowns. Usually you can tell when you do an eggtopsy because the egg will have excess moisture in it and the chick will be super wet and possibly sticky. The other side of that is if your humidity was too low you will find your chicks have become shrinkwrapped by the membrane and suffocated.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2015
  7. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    I thought that shrink wrapping was a result of not enough humidity. Also, if I remember from previous reading, humidity too high may result in the chick getting too big, which would result in a lot of mal-positions and death before pip, b/c the chick can't maneuver in the egg.
     
  8. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    What?? What are you talking about? Are you seeing things??? LOL That's what I get get from getting on BYC and trying to type 15 minute after getting out of bed...lol My mind and fingers do not work together. Yes, too low is the flip side. TY.
     
  9. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Yes, because the air cell is too small they have extra room to grow. I believe that is also listed in the maleposition section of the hatching 101 thread as something to look at if you have multiple malepositioned chicks in one hatch.
     

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