Hunting Chickens

Discussion in 'Pictures & Stories of My Chickens' started by chikkenfriend, Sep 14, 2014.

  1. chikkenfriend

    chikkenfriend Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I prefer herding/working dogs. Which is why we have a breeding pair of Red Heelers. But this is not to say I don’t like hunting dogs. I would love having a Bloodhound in the family. And Rusty. Our Golden Retriever is a total sweetheart/killing machine.

    Rusty is loyal, smart as all get out, and she backs down from nothing. She’s definitely one of the bravest dog I’ve known.

    Then there's Mouse. She’s an Italian Greyhound and the best mouser on the planet! What makes her so good is that she loves EATING rats and mice. Who needs a cat when you have a dog that can outrun one and doesn’t play with her food? She eats it. She has a job and she does it well. Which brings me to the reason for writing this.

    Our land is always being invaded, though not quite over-run, by rabbits. Bringing to mind the idea of raising some for meat and additional income. And, as luck would have it, my DW spotted one a few days ago that peaked her interest. I finally saw this juicy morsel and the hunt is on!

    Picture this: In my stealthiest crouch, I quickly flank it, moving around to the West, blocking its retreat. Using the greenhouse for cover, on all fours now, I move in. Phase one of my strategy is deception. In my sweetest forked-tongue speak, I spew at it, all manner of falsehood, fraudulence and disinformation. What happened next, though unexpected, shall be, from now on, my Secret Weapon.

    “Ooh, Papa’s got treats!” cried Ayla, the crazy Barred Rock as she ran over to eat this new goodie that Papa done brung just for her.

    “It looks delicious,” replied Beethoven, followed by two more Rocks and six Red Stars.

    Surrounded and outnumbered, having lost all hope, the rabbit resigned itself to at least die with its boots on. It charged the heathen hordes that were laying siege! Big mistake. That brought in the rest of the troops. The Orps to the North, one crazy Australorp to the East, and a band of psychotic guineas (a.k.a. The Goonies) flooding in from the South. All was lost.

    I picked it up.

    Sixty some odd dollars later, the rabbit, now known as King George VII, sits quietly enjoying some much needed pellets and some very welcome Timothy grass. Not so sure about that round, salty thing, though.

    The King has been dethroned! George, the Broken Rex, is in the B&R Ranch dungeon. There he shall reside until his reformation and indoctrination is complete. Then, at said time, shall he be set free-range with his captors that they might, once again, drool over him.

    So, Hunting-Chickens, not hunting chickens. What kinda nut hunts chickens? You’re weird.


    In the heat of battle!
    [​IMG]

    Victory!
    [​IMG]

    Based on a true story. Film at 11.
     
  2. scratch'n'peck

    scratch'n'peck Overrun With Chickens

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    Chickens who hunt in a group! Oh my, that's quite a story!
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2014
  3. chikkenfriend

    chikkenfriend Chillin' With My Peeps

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    True story. We got him yesterday. We figured he escaped from his owners and had been living in our neighbor's field. Neighbor harvested a few weeks ago. Nothing left over there. But there is freshly mowed grass on our land.

    We tried the day before, DW and I, but he just ran off back into the field. So, when I saw him the next day, I tried the quiet, gentle approach. I literally crawled toward it, talking to it and pulling tender grass and tossing it his way. Then our chickens invaded when they saw and heard me. Wheezy jumped on my back while I was down there. All our chickens came. And the Goonies too.

    They did surround it. And the rabbit did jump at them when they got too close. But they were too many. They pushed it back toward me (I guess I should tell you that I kept mentioning all the yummy treat words during all this) and I grabbed him up. I knew for sure he was tame then. He just melted in my arms. Maybe he figured I saved him from the vicious killer attack chickens!

    Best we can figure, he's a Broken Rex. Very soft, velvety fur. And calico. He's quite beautiful. And yes, he's a he. DW checked.

    We're going into town this week for a hutch. And a mate? Hopefully...
     
  4. theophila

    theophila Out Of The Brooder

    Oh my. Pretty rex! And crazy story! Is he litter box trained?
     
  5. chikkenfriend

    chikkenfriend Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Don't know yet. We didn't want to buy too much until we had an actual hutch. But he knows feeders and waterers. And he loves to be held and petted. Good start, no yes?
     
  6. HighStreetCoop

    HighStreetCoop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Great start! I had a lop that was litter box trained when I was a kid. Really enjoyed having a house rabbit.
     
  7. chikkenfriend

    chikkenfriend Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That might not be so easy. The house rabbit part, that is. My Golden Retriever has been leaving ponds all over the place drooling over George!

    The Heelers aren't too interested in it while it's in the kennel. But let it out, hey, they'll chew on anything. They eat rocks for crying out loud!

    No, we'll get it familiar with us for awhile and then we'll free-range it. He really is a big baby. Loves to be held and petted. I think he'll be just fine.

    Peace
     
  8. theophila

    theophila Out Of The Brooder

    Litter boxes are VERY cheap. And they don't have to be specifically made. Even a plastic or metal pan lined with absorbent material or hay. It's pretty easy. Put one wherever the rabbit likes to poop or pee - usually in a corner - and then reduce down to a single litter box. They're creatures of habit. Just make sure he has lots of rough stuff to dig or chew at in order to grind down his teeth and nails (or trim his nails regularly - making sure to avoid the quick!).
     

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